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Jon’s 1991 Honda Civic Wagon RT4WD, Pt 2

Editor’s note: We’ve seen a lot of lifted Crosstreks of late, but here’s something a little different that might qualify as the spiritual ancestor of those unibody off-road crossovers. Here, Jon Seaton gives us a build breakdown for his off-road Civic Wagon.

 


 

There are only a few people in the world with a lifted Civic as modified as mine. It would be easier to say what hasn't been modified! I'll start with my lift kit/suspension set up. 

My current lift is an HRG Engineering 6" long-arm kit. Besides the lift kit itself, I'm running a completely new set of ‘98-‘01 Honda CRV springs/struts on all four corners. With the newest lift, I'm looking to go up in tire size so I've been eyeballing a set of BFGoodrich® Mud Terrain T/A KM3s in 30x9.5x15, but I would need to test fit all my clearances since I just finished my lift kit.

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As far as engine/transmission modifications, I swapped my motor from the stock D16A6 that was rated for 106hp to the Japanese-only D16A9 (130hp) or the "ZC DOHC," as most Honda people may know it. The "ZC" motor is the only dual overhead cam motor that will bolt to the Civic Wagon RT4WD transmission. That motor was always a dream setup for my off-road wagon build because it was a non-VTEC and moderately torquey motor from an early ‘90s Honda. This motor, combined with the great gearing from the RT4WD, makes for a very competent setup.

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The RT4WD transmission actually has an "SL" or Super Low gear that is made for pulling out of deep snow or mud. I use the SL gear quite often in my off-roading as it provides a great gearing for getting short bursts of torque and wheel speed to bounce the Civic Wagon over obstacles. 

The body is pretty stock for the most part. I installed a custom snorkel last year and have had to use it several times due since the Civic’s low nose profile likes to shovel mud. I built a custom skid plate out of 1/8" steel to give myself a touch more insurance off road. With my previous lift, I had to cut the front fenders to fit my current tire set up, so I used a set of universal fender flares to cover my wheel arches. 

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Currently, I run BFGoodrich® Mud Terrain T/A KM2s in 215/75/R15 on 15x6.5 Sparco Terra wheels. My tire choice was very easy once I saw that KM2s came in a 215/75/R15. I've always been a huge believer of "You get what you paid for," and in the tire department, that is especially true. If I'm going to build an off-road rig, I want a proven tire that won't leave me stranded. I need something that I don't even have to think about; something that will work when I need it to. When I bought my first set of KM2s for my Civic Wagon, people's jaws hit the floor. I was asked a hundred times what my tire setup was. I had a few other Honda guys go out immediately and purchase KM2s for themselves.

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I know that when people see an off-road rig, most of the true enthusiasts will look at the tire selection first. I know this, because I am one of those guys. You can tell a lot about a rig by the type of tires you decide to trust, so when people see my Civic Wagon sitting on a beautiful set of KM2s, they know that I must have done my homework and that I'm not here to sit in a mall parking lot. 

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I have been in constant awe of how well these tires perform. The main question I get about them are, "Well, are they loud?" And the answer is, “Not even the least bit.” Cheap tires are loud. These BFGs have incredible road manners, even in a light Honda Civic! The next question I'm always asked is, "Did they affect gearing? Can you go over 50mph in that thing?" Of course, the MPH reading isn't matched to my stock speedometer, but I can cruise on the interstate at a GPS-verified 75mph and still accelerate up to 80 and beyond. These tires are not insanely heavy, and my 30-year-old four-cylinder motor has no issue cruising down the interstate on them.

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Probably the best experience I had with them was on a trip from Arkansas to North Carolina and back. I was dreading the trip, as it would be the furthest trip I’d taken in my Civic Wagon by far. However, I ade it there AND back without a single hiccup in the middle of summer. The KM2s don't show an ounce of wear from the trip, and they were excellent in the rain. Honestly, if there's any mud terrain tire to trust in that situation, it’s BFGoodrich® Tires.

 


 

Learn more about Jon’s Civic Hatch and follow his build evolution on Instagram and Youtube

 

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Build

Jon’s 1991 Honda Civic Wagon RT4WD, Pt 1

Editor’s note: We’ve seen a lot of lifted Crosstreks of late, but here’s something a little different that might qualify as the spiritual ancestor of those unibody off-road crossovers. Here, Jon Seaton tells us how he decided to do an off-road build based on a Civic Wagon. For details on the build, check out Pt 2 of this story.

 


 

All my life I’ve been around cars. My mom was always into beautiful cars that caught the eye, and my dad was always into something loud and ugly, but ran like a bat out of hell. I think I embody both of those traits. I love the design and intent that goes into every car ever made, but at the same time, my own cars are purpose built and oftentimes pretty rowdy. I went to school to become an engineer basically to fund my car habit. I'm always looking into new and crazy builds, much like my Civic Wagon.

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The origin of my Civic Wagon come from playing in the mud as a kid. Even when I could barely walk, I was waist deep in a mud puddle with my Tonka trucks. By the time I had a GoKart I was buried neck deep in mud holes until the mud dried on me like a mummy. When I was around 8 years old, my dad started getting into rock crawling with his ‘79 CJ7, and we spent nearly every summer on the side of a mountain going up some insane incline. A few years later, my dad and a few investors went in and established the Hot Springs Off-Road Vehicle Park, the first park in Hot Springs, Arkansas. I spent many of my teenage years help setting the place up and working to clear trails. We would always be out on the mountains with a group of Jeeps and trucks until the early morning hours.

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I could have easily picked up a 4x4 Jeep, truck, or SUV to make into an off-road rig, but I've always been one to stray away from the normal, and in my heart, I'm an old Honda nut. I love anything Honda because of the amount of time that Honda focuses on making a reliable, cheap-to-own vehicle. For the last decade, I've had some sort of Civic Wagon as they always had a soft spot in my heart, the Civic Wagon community is absolutely great.

The Civic Wagon platform is so incredibly diverse. We have people who drag race them, rallycross them, autocross them, slam them on the ground, and lift them to the sky. I decided to do the latter with my recent Civic Wagon as my roots are deep in the off-road community.

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The Civic Wagon is fairly uncommon in the off-road scene for a few reasons. One reason is the absolute rarity of the Civic Wagon RT4WD in the wild. Over the past decade, they’ve come in and out of the mainstream, and scavengers love to get the rare Honda AWD parts from them to sell at an inflated rate.

This has caused prices of parts to skyrocket, and there’s an increased scarcity of components. The knowledge for how to set up a proper off-road vehicle is also not prevalent in the Civic Wagon world. My good friends at HRG Engineering and I are working on making the Civic Wagon platform a much more capable off-road rig. Being an engineer, I've been deep into research over the past year in making the Civic Wagon an even better off-road rig.

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The Civic Wagon doesn't use a center differential or a traditional transfer case. Instead, the Civic Wagon uses a viscous coupler to engage the rear wheels when the front loses traction. This is not favorable for slow approach off-roading or crawling, so within the next few months I will have developed an improved swappable viscous coupler from a much more hearty off-road rig. A few more trips to the junkyard and I'll have my proof of concept complete and ready to mount to my Civic Wagon. One great off-road aspect of the Civic Wagon is it's light weight. Paired with super grippy BFGoodrich® Mud Terrain T/A KM2 tires, I can just cruise over obstacles that many Jeeps cannot navigate.

Like previously mentioned, I love being the odd ball when it comes to my builds. You see a million Jeeps out there in the trails, but when you see a Civic Wagon out and about, you really see something incredible. The reactions I get at Hot Springs ORV Park are priceless. Everyone loves it, and I get asked a million questions about it.

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It's an absolute neck-breaker here in the South. I cannot go to a gas station without someone running over to take pictures or talk with me. It’s such a joy and pleasure to see people curious about the Civic Wagons. Possibly my favorite type of person to stop me is the older gentlemen who had Civic Wagons back in the day. They always truly appreciate that we take care of ours and that we still drive them today.

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Learn more about Jon’s Civic Hatch and follow his build evolution on Instagram and Youtube

 

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Build

Marcus’ 2007 Toyota FJ Cruiser

Editor’s note: Unlike many of the folks who picked up their love for off-roading from parents and family, Marcus found his way off the beaten path on his own. Along the way, he came to discover what a capable off-road vehicle could do.

 




I was never super into vehicles when growing up. I was more interested in music and sports. My folks didn't come from North America and truly lived with challenges most of us could not relate to. Camping outdoors or going off-road wasn't very appealing to them.

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On the other hand, I caught the bug. My interest in camping and exploring has grown exponentially. It didn't take long for standard campsites to lose their luster. I wanted to be able to truly explore North America away from pavilions and tourist crowded boardwalks. When I started going on regular camping trips and traveling more remotely, vehicles started coming into the forefront of my interests. Once I realized where you can go in a capable 4WD vehicle, it changed everything for me and really opened a whole new world to discover. 

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My FJ Cruiser has been the key. I love its ability to reliably get us places most people can't. Admittedly, it's not the best vehicle to build out for 4WD touring and overlanding due to its lack of interior cargo space. But as a person who is very camping focused, I also see that as a positive. It really makes us slow down and ask, Is this a want or a need? Is this going to be useful and add to our experience, or just take up space?

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The build is very much focused on backcountry travel and exploration. Much of my home province is rarely seen by the average person. You actually can't even drive from Southern Manitoba to Northern Manitoba. How many places can say the same?!

All the mods serve this vision. We run a full aluminum skid plate setup from Ricochet, rock sliders, and airbags in the rear springs to help when we are loaded up on gear. We also run a TRD Supercharger with a URD pulley, an added 7th fuel injector, TRD cold air intake, Doug Thorley long-tube headers, and a high flow exhaust system. All this gives us a nice power boost when making miles on pavement and traversing terrain.

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We’re also happy to run BFGoodrich® Tires because they are a name I trust. We have BFGOODRICH® All-Terrain T/A KO2 tires (217/70R16) wrapped around TRD bronze beadlock wheels. It's amazing how tough these tires are. It's easy to say that BFGoodrich is a proven company with years of tech put into the product. All that technology shows when you stress your tires as we do. We often run low air pressures through some really nasty terrain — everything from incredibly dense Canadian forests to ice and snow covered rocks.  

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In the future, I want to expand on the FJ Cruiser’s off-road ability with a full suspension overhaul, 35” tires for added clearance, and a much-needed winch.  

I really only started getting my first taste of camping in my late teens and got into 4WD vehicles in my mid-twenties. Looking where I stand now, it's quite funny. If you don't pay attention, some interests can really grip you and become a large driving force for your life's ambitions.

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See more of Marcus’ FJ Cruiser on Instagram at @marcusisleite

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Build

Crown Hicks

Editor’s note: What started out as a joke has turned into a very real, totally functional — but still hilarious — builds. Meet Skyler Pittman, one of the geniuses behind the lifted Ford Crown Victoria Police Interceptors known as the Crown Hicks.

 


 

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I was always into cars. My dad owns a business, Snap Rebuilders, which specializes in rebuilding and building custom alternators, starters, and distributors. As a kid, my mom would bring me there to visit my dad at work. During high school, I started helping out at the company until I started going to school for what I really wanted to do: collision work. That’s where Cameron Ramage and I met.

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We both had long commutes to Utah Valley University. We’d meet at my place every morning at 6AM and carpool to make it to our class by 7AM. After a while, a 1986 Dodge Ram W250 getting 8 miles per gallon started to get really old, so I bought an OG Ford Crown Victoria. That old taxi ended up having 465,000 miles on the clock that I bought for $500 because I was a broke college student.

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We used this car a lot for assignments in our labs. For our frame measuring and pulling class, we found out it got hit hard at some point in its life. It was shaped like a banana, so we set it up on the frame rack and got ready to pull it straight. Our instructor was also in charge the off-road and adventure club, so there were always random tires laying around. Some joker thought it’d be funny to stick some 37-inch tires in the wheel arches, and the idea was born: the off-road Crown Vic.

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After the frame was straightened and a paint job, the first thing we did was head off-road completely  stock. We immediately broke the radiator trying to go up a mountain. We wound up strap towing that garbage 10 miles to the closest town, abandoning it, and driving 2 hours to buy the closest radiator. We replaced it in a gas station parking lot. After that, lifts, tires, and shenanigans became the norm. 

I’m currently driving a blue 2008 Ford Crown Victoria Police Interceptor, and Cameron has a white 2006 Ford Crown Victoria Police Interceptor. The 1.0 version of this build unfortunately got totaled after a crash. Both CVPIs have a 3-inch donk puck suspension lift, 2015 Ford F-350 rear shocks, and factory limited-slip differentials. 

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My car also has a cattle guard off of a 2015 Chevrolet Silverado, plus an upgraded transmission and high stall converter. I also bought a take-off set of BFGoodrich® Mud Terrain T/A KMs (255/75R17) from the local classifieds and made them work. They’re quiet, smooth, and have great traction in the mud and snow.

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I spend a lot of time at Five Mile Pass, while Cameron spends his time around Farmington Canyon. Sometimes we’ll caravan to the Bonneville Salt Flats. There’s so much to do off-road in Utah, it’s the perfect state for these cars.

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These cars naturally get a lot of attention. It’s funny to watch people take pictures of us going down the freeway, or roll down their windows and give a thumbs up even though it’s 20-degrees outside. We get asked why we did this to our cars at every single gas station, and our response is always the same: “Why not?!” Crown Victorias are cheap, readily available, reliable, and they come with a V8. In our minds, they’re the perfect budget Raptors.

 


 

Follow the Crown Hicks on Instagram at @thecrownhicks.

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Build

David’s 2007 Nissan 350Z

Editor’s note: Team Hybrid’s David Angeles David had a simple goal: build a car he could drift as well as he could show it. With a SEMA Show feature in 2018 behind him, we’d say he’s well on his way. 

 


 

I’ve always owned cars that were front wheel drive, but because I am interested in drifting, when I saw this 2007 Nissan 350Z on Facebook Marketplace, I knew I had to have it. The 350Z is a good platform to learn how to drift on, and I've always liked the style of a sporty two-door car.

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So far, this car has a widebody kit, custom paint, a roll cage, WORK Wheels, Bride seats, a carbon fiber hood, carbon fiber hatch, carbon fiber front bumper, BFGoodrich® g-Force COMP-2 A/S tires, and plenty more. My build isn’t complete, and there are more exciting modifications to come. 

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My plan is for this car to be both a show car and a drift car. I want to able to have fun with my friends at the track and also put it on display at car shows. I love how I can take the car into an open parking lot to get it sideways, and then drive four hours away for a car show.

Of course, I didn’t build this car by myself. When I was a kid, I watched my uncle build his Scion XB from the ground up. From there, I started building RC cars and began wrenching and learning in garages with my older friends whenever I got the chance. 

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Then, I came across Team Hybrid when I was 16 years old. I had just gotten my first car, and I was at an Import Face-Off event in Las Vegas when I saw them. Then, I went to college in Arizona and met Team Hybrid's Arizona chapter director, Albie Sanchez. He was in one of my classes at Universal Technical Institute, and he introduced me to the legendary team. I decided to join Team Hybrid’s Arizona chapter and later transferred to the Nevada chapter.  

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I was very fortunate to have my 350Z be a feature car at the SEMA Show in 2018, and I have to thank Team Hybrid founder and president James Lin for creating an undefeatable team and all his hard work for over 24 years. He is always leading by example and innovating day-in and day-out. I also want to send Hybrid Luv to Nevada Chapter Director, Archie Concon and future leader, Charleston Penesa.  I would also like to thank all the team title sponsorships that have helped us along the way, especially BFGoodrich® Tires, Meguiar's, AMSOIL, Whiteline, K&N Filters, Mishimoto, NRG Innovations, and Password:JDM.

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See more of David’s 350Z on Instagram at @davidx2__z33. Photographs courtesy of Alex Sanchez (@rex.media), Ignacio Varela (@nacho__photos), and Paul Delapena (@pjdmedia_).

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Adventure Build

Wild Man

Editor’s note: Andrew Barber loves the mystery of the wilderness, and his 2008 Jeep Wrangler is his preferred method for investigating. He spends his time outdoors, all over Vermont (and the rest of New England), but he’s got his sights set on bigger adventures in the future.  

 


 

Growing up in rural Vermont, I have always been an amateur outdoor adventurer. I enjoy hiking, trail running, kayaking, skiing, and trying to get as close as I can to wild animals I probably shouldn’t get close to. I never really had an interest in automotive until I was in college. While I was there, I made friends with someone who showed me what a well-built vehicle is capable of in the wild. We would go out and explore the backwoods of Vermont in his 1980-something Toyota 4Runner on the weekends. I became hooked instantly. Once I graduated college, it was time to buy an new vehicle and I knew it would have to be something I could venture into the wilderness with. The decision to get a Jeep was an easy one, considering I had been driving around my mother’s TJ every chance I could get.

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Four years later, I have explored miles of abandoned roads and trails all around Vermont. While doing so, I have also picked up photography as skill. I find so many cool places while wandering and I wanted to find a way to share them. While setting up my camera, I try not only to get a good Jeep pose, but also share the scenic spots I find and show the types of environments my Jeep has traversed through.

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Luckily, Vermont has an array of trail environments. My Jeep has seen it all. I have traveled through mud, snow, ice, rocky roads, ledges, water-crossings, long distance highway trips, and pothole-riddled I-95 outside NYC. (I broke some U-joints there.) While a well-built Jeep is always capable, arguably the most important factor (other than the engine) of any type of travel would be the tires. If you don’t have good tires, you will be limited.

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I knew from the beginning I wanted to go with BFGoodrich® All-Terrain T/A KO2 tires.  I’m currently running a 285/70/R17 tire on Black Rock wheels that have 4.25” backspacing with a Teraflex 2.5” suspension lift. This combination gives me plenty of tire room and clearance for almost any obstacle.

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The tires are rugged, have great sidewall protection, and are one of the most favored tires in the overloading community. I have read many accounts by professional overlanders that these tires are well worthy of any conditions, and those accounts have all proven to be true. As mentioned before, I have traveled through all types of terrain, and my KO2s are awesome. They are smooth on pavement, and perform very well in snow and mud — two things Vermont has a lot of. I have had them for three of the four years I’ve owned my Jeep, and I don’t plan on changing tires anytime soon. When it’s time for new ones, I will be going with BFGoodrich again.

Wilderness exploration has been and always will be a big hobby of mine, and I hope to plan bigger journeys in the future. I am slowly building up my Jeep, and hope to start giving overlanding a shot soon. I have had a lot of practice with rough terrain here in Vermont, and I’ve learned so much about driving off-road, wrenching, and what equipment is truly necessary for traveling deep into the woods without cellphone service or anyone knowing where you’re located.

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The mystery behind what I’ll find out there is what keeps me going back. You never know what you’re going to see.  Whether a large animal, an abandoned house, a runaway convict, a cool Jeep trail, or just a nice place to take a picture, I’m always ready for a surprise. The more practice I get, the more adventurous I become, and I have no plans of stopping anytime soon. My ultimate adventure would be to ship my Jeep over to Africa or Australia and travel across one of the continents. I still feel I have a lot to learn before I do that, but I will get there eventually. Until then, I will continue to find new places on a more local scale, plan a cross country trip, and practice my photography.

Here are my current vehicle specs:

  • 2008 Jeep Wrangler JK X
  • BFGoodrich® All-Terrain T/A KO2 (285/70/R17) on Black Rock 909 Type-D 17x9 Wheels
  • Teraflex 2.5” Suspension Lift with Rough Country Easy Disconnect swaybar links
  • Warn Zeon 10s Winch
  • JCR Offroad Crusader Midwidth Bumpers (Front and Rear)
  • JCR Offroad Classic Rock Sliders
  • Carbon Offroad front axle shafts
  • Hi-Lift Jack mounted on sportbar with River Raider Offroad mount
  • Bartact Seat Covers
  • Bestop Trektop NX
  • A pair of KC lights on the front and rear bumpers, and a lightbar
  • My all-time favorite mod: a shift knob replica of John Hammond’s mosquito in amber cane from the movie Jurassic Park. I made it myself.

 


 

Keep up with Andrew Barber’s adventures on Instagram at @gothewild

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Adventure Build

Gon’ Dirtin’

Editor’s note: Karissa and Linhbergh are regulars in the automotive industry, which means they have plenty of experience with all the gear and equipment out there. But for their 1999 Mitsubishi Montero, they chose BFGoodrich® All-Terrain T/A KO2 tires for one simple reason: they wanted the best.

 


 

Karissa was born and raised in a small town in Texas. She grew up around her family’s car audio shop, attended car events, and was surrounded by the automotive consumer industry. She became heavily influenced by her older brother, and is also a huge fan of Japanese culture. Karissa began wrenching on cars at a young age and found herself behind the wheel of a fully built 1994 Mazda RX-7.

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Linhbergh was born and raised in the San Francisco Bay Area. He grew up immersed in the outdoors. Hiking in the mountains, days in the forests or on the lakes and the beach were all normal weekend activities in Northern California. He was never into cars growing up. But when he relocated to Los Angeles 15 years ago, he spent around 2.5 hours a day, in a car, commuting to work every day. The thought of wanting to love the car he spent so much time in became real! And thus, he got his first real car: a 1992 Mazda Miata. From there, it became an explosion of parking lot meets, track days, tinkering in the garage, weekend drives up the mountains, and exploring other car cultures. He, of course, started experimenting taking photos of his Miata with a point-and-shoot camera, which has blossomed into a decade-long career.

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Fast forward to today, the JDM stayed strong with both Karissa and Linhbergh as they’ve added a 1999 Mitsubishi Montero to their garage. It’s nice to not always think about steering clear of potholes, and knowing that their vehicle is capable of clearing rocks on a trail is still something the both of them are getting used to.

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The Montero came about because they realized how often they wanted to trade the hustle and bustle of the city for the solitude and stillness of nature. They started looking at Toyotas, but realized they were out of their budget. They started looking at alternatives, and fell in love with the look and features of a 1999 Mitsubishi Montero with its stock over fenders. The Montero offered them everything they had hoped for. It was rugged, reliable, cost effective, and looked so damn cool with a bit of dirt flung all over it.

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One thing led to another and they started to modify their truck to suit their needs for living on the road. What was originally a simple point-A-to-point-B weekend vehicle became a full-fledged SUV to carry them, and their dog, out on a trail for weeks, and potentially months! Upgrades to suspension, tires, and adding an ARB roof top tent helped them be a little more comfortable while out in the bush. The installation of solar panels and a second battery helped supply their power needs for a refrigerator and the ability to work remotely wherever they may be.

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“Working more than 10 years in the automotive industry has definitely influenced our choices in equipment and gear,” says Linhbergh. “You start to realize that paying money upfront really does go a long way. When you pay more, you get a much, much better product, and one that lasts a long time. Gone are the days of buying cheap modifications, or gear. We categorize ourselves as “heavy use” users of equipment, which means we put everything to use its absolute limit: tires, suspension, wheels, camera gear, tent, sleeping bags, hiking clothes, and cooking equipment all see pretty heavy, and sometimes extreme, usage.”

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That’s what led them to choose BFGoodrich® All-Terrain T/A KO2 tires for their Montero. “Working in the automotive industry, you know that BFGs are the best in the off-road sector. KO2s are the quietest, best functioning, and aesthetically aggressive all-terrain tire on the market,” says Linhbergh. “We, of course, wanted the best.” (For the record, they run a 285/75R16 on a 16x8” +0 wheel.)

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Karissa and Linhbergh have owned their Montero for two years, and in that time, they’ve put over 40,000 miles on it. “Long weekend getaways have been what our schedules allow,” says Linhbergh. “We spend much of our time up California’s infamous Highway 395 in the Sierra Nevada mountains. Living in California, we are blessed with an abundance of scenery. The epic coast lines along PCH, with its stunning views, never get old.”

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The couple recently did a two-week trip to Utah and Colorado. Making their way east of California, they began to fall in love with the desert. They explored Zion NPS’ narrows, and Colorado’s vast network of OHV trails and parks. They’ve explored countless places which makes it tough to narrow down favorites, but Yosemite, Sedona, and the public land of Northern California and Utah rank at the top.  For 2019, they’ve got even more in store.

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“We plan to spend the New Year with friends in Baja, Mexico, and explore the whole peninsula. Throughout 2019, we hope to venture out further across the United States. In 2020 and beyond, our goal is to trek to Alaska, and eventually tackle the South American continent. Exploring southern Africa is also on the books!”

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Follow Karissa and Linhbergh on Instagram at @gondirtin

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Build

Bryan’s 2017 Subaru Crosstrek

Editor’s note: New Jersey isn’t what most people think of when it comes to off-roading, and Bryan Grosinski didn’t buy his Hyper Blue Crosstrek with the intention of taking it off-road. But as it often happens with the Subaru community, in for a penny, in for a pound.

 


 

I’ve always liked having a car that stood out just a little from regular, everyday drivers. Pretty much every car I've owned has been modified in one way or another, whether it's "go fast" mods or "go anywhere" mods.

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My girlfriend Kelley and I didn't exactly choose the Crosstrek to be an off-road vehicle! We chose it because of its safety, reliability, and style — especially the color! And living in New Jersey, we wanted something with four-wheel drive. After about a year of owning it, we discovered that there was actually a pretty large Subaru off-road community. We became friends with some local Subaru owners and started going to meets and off-road rides.

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It’s honestly something I would never have imagined doing with this car, but we love the fact that we are part of a community of other enthusiasts that share the same crazy ideas as us! Some are way more extreme than we'll ever be, but so far, our Crosstrek has:

  • Subtle Solutions 1.5 inch lift, front and rear.
  • Primitive Racing skid plates for the engine, transmission, and rear differential.
  • Method Racing MR502 wheels (15x7) wrapped with BFGoodrich® All-Terrain T/A KO2 tires (215/75R15). I chose KO2 tires because of its history of being a great quality off-road/on-road tire. This car is a daily driver, so I wanted something that would continue to get decent gas mileage and not be ridiculously loud on the highways. Also, the look of the tire is just nice!
  • SSD Performance Subaru Rally Light Bar with a Rough Country 30-inch dual row led light bar.
  • We also have a Thule HyperXL cargo box to pack all our gear in for our adventures.
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Our favorite off-road journey to date is Shafer Canyon Road in Canyonlands National Park near Moab, Utah. Moab in general is one of our favorite places to vacation. There are so many hidden gems around New Jersey as well. We try to explore as much as our busy lives let us!

 


 

Catch more of this bright blue Crosstrek on Instagram at @pooper_duck. And for the record, there’s nothing special about the name. As Bryan says, “It was just something I said in my sleep. My girlfriend thought was funny and wrote it down. It had nothing to do with the car, but now everyone knows the car as Pooper Duck!”

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