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One Spec to Rule Them All

Long Road Racing is deep in NASCAR country. Located off an I-40 frontage road in Statesville, NC, LRR is just up the road from Charlotte Motor Speedway, and there’s plenty of NASCAR reminders all around. For one, it’s common to see semi-trailers going up and down I-40 bearing the visages of stock car legends. (Today, Richard Petty’s face zooms by.) For another, there’s Long Road Racing’s facility: a former NASCAR race shop.

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But for all that racing heritage, LRR builds racecars of a completely different sort. They have the distinction of being the one and only builder for every racecar in the Battery Tender® Mazda Global MX-5 Cup presented by BFGoodrich Tires. That’s right. In the land of 700+ horsepower stock cars, they build 155-horsepower Mazda roadster racecars.

 


 

To understand the niche LRR occupies, it helps to understand the landscape of Mazda Motorsports. Accessible, affordable racing has always been a significant part of Mazda Motorsports’ identity. They claim more vehicles road-raced than any other manufacturer, and their support for every level of racing — from grassroots club racing, to professional sports car racing — is a big reason why. Through the Mazda Road to 24 and Mazda Road to Indy programs, there are also developmental programs that give club racers a real pathway to becoming professional drivers. 

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That professional driver development ladder begins at the club level with the Spec Miata class in SCCA and NASA. Spec MX-5 is the next level up, culminating in the Global MX-5 Cup as the top level series.

While the lower level series are spec in name, there’s a ton of variance in builds based on experience and budget. “You could spend $30,000, or you could spend $60,000,” says Glenn Long, the founder/owner of LRR. With that range in spending comes a range in capability, fit-and-finish, and safety for those cars, which ultimately defeats the purpose of these driving series. If you can buy your way into a faster car, driver skill and talent become less important. And if the only way to be competitive is to spend more money on the car, affordability and accessibility go out the window.

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That’s where Long Road Racing’s MX-5 builds come in. As the release of the fourth-generation ND Miata approached, Mazda knew it wanted to create a true, single-spec series. Mazda already had familiarity with Glenn and his family: Tom Long, Glenn’s son, came up the Mazda Motorsports development ladder, driving Spec Miata, winning Pro Spec Miata in 2005, and then earning a spot on the Mazda Motorsports Prototype team in 2013. (He now co-drives the No. 77 TRUMPF Audi RS3 LMS with Britt Casey, Jr. in the TCR class of IMSA Sportscar  Challenge.) Glenn was also heavily involved, managing Tom’s teams and building cars. Collaborating on the Global MX-5 Cup car was a natural fit.

 


 

There’s more to creating a spec racecar than ordering batches of parts and bolting them onto a vehicle. A lot more. To ensure that the playing field for Global MX-5 Cup races is as even as possible, Mazda and LRR wanted to remove as many variables from the equation as possible. At the beginning of the project, that meant an extremely rigorous testing regimen. For Glenn — who’s previous professional stop was at IBM, a notoriously data-driven company — all of those data points would inform their decisions.

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The LRR team took a factory-fresh ND Miata and put it through kinematics and compliance (K&C) testing, checking over 300 separate elements to build a detailed computer model of the chassis. Once the chassis characteristics were logged, LRR attacked the suspension buildout by identifying the best tire and damper combination. Given the importance of suspension to a racecar, and that it would be one of the few parameters Global MX-5 Cup teams could adjust or tune, Glenn and his engineering team needed components that would perform consistently and predictably throughout the entire range of adjustment and potential performance envelope. 

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All told, Long Road Racing received proposals from 11 damper companies and 9 tires manufacturers. If you’re counting, that meant nearly a hundred combinations — far too many to test in real world conditions within a reasonable amount of time. Luckily, the LLR engineering team was able to whittle down the field by plugging damper-tire combinations into the ND’s mathematical model, arriving at final candidate list of three dampers and three tires.

The LRR team took a factory-fresh ND Miata and put it through kinematics and compliance (K&C) testing, checking over 300 separate elements to build a detailed computer model of the chassis.

Then, they took an ND to Carolina Motorsports Park and drove the snot of out those combinations. At the end of the day, the vendors of choice were Dynamic Suspensions and BFGoodrich® Tires. And that’s when the real fun began.

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As thorough as the testing was up to this point, LRR saw this as a baseline for further developing the Global MX-5 Cup cars. The dampers and tires were further tweaked and aligned so that they would work in concert to deliver the performance characteristics LRR sought.

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While the tires and dampers resemble off-the-shelf counterparts — Multimatic DSSV dampers and BFGoodrich® g-Force R1s — their performance characteristics were tuned specifically for these Cup cars. The end result is a bespoke damper and tire setup completely unique to these cars. That means these cars are the only ones that benefit from LRR’s extensive research and development.

 


 

Of course, suspension and tires aren’t the only aspects of the MX-5 that LRR touched. Glenn’s team established further engineering criteria for the racecar, and after logging thousands of development miles and hours of testing and analysis, they settling on a configuration that features the addition of over 250 racing-specific components. 

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To get to a race-ready Cup car, Glenn and his engineering team start out with a factory-fresh Sport trim-level ND in white. (The color choice alone saves 15 pounds compared to other paint options.) From there, the interior is stripped down to the metal tub so that every bit of seam sealer and sound deadening material can be cleaned up and removed.

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All the factory interior components are tagged and logged to each source vehicle’s VIN number. Then the roll cage — designed to further enhance the positive characteristics of the ND chassis, as well as comply with FIA, SCCA, IMSA, and NASA regulations — is TIG-welded in and tied together across the firewall through the interior of the dash. After the roll cage is welded in, the tub and cage are painted, and the build can start in earnest.

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Long Road Racing knew from the beginning that some factory components would need to be upgraded, and other components added. For example, the factory cooling solutions simply wouldn’t suffice. While there was plenty of headroom for regular street driving, there wasn’t enough cooling to accommodate the rigors of motorsports, so in went an oversized C&R radiator, a Setrab engine oil cooler, and Setrab pumps and coolers for both the transmission and the limited-slip differential.

By doing as much in-house as possible, it was easier for Long Road Racing to ensure parts continuity and consistency of weight and performance.

The need for other components only surfaced after some experience. For example, LRR discovered that the factory front strut tower braces were manufactured to two different specifications, despite sharing one part number. While the braces appeared identical to an inventory system, the actual performance differed. To remove that as a potential source of competitive advantage or disadvantage, LRR engineered and manufactured their own cross brace. 

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It’s the same story for most of the other components LRR uses. It just made more sense for LRR to engineer and manufacture their own parts. By doing as much in-house as possible, it was easier to ensure parts continuity and consistency of weight and performance, rather than place that in the hands of third-party vendors, who might choose to redesign parts without considering the potential impact on a single-spec race series.

The full spec sheet can be found here.

While developing, engineering, and building a worthy car is a large part of Long Road Racing’s portfolio, they’re also heavily involved from a support standpoint. For each of the 185 cars they’ve built to Global MX-5 Cup specification, they’ve cataloged every part — down to the batch and lot numbers. That means if individual components are recalled — if a vendor calls and says the machine manufacturing a hose or fitting happened to be miscalibrated — LRR can identify exactly which vehicles are affected.

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Furthermore, Long Road Racing attends each Global MX-5 Cup race with a trailer full of parts and technicians in tow. There, they supply technical expertise for race teams, assist race officials with scrutineering, as well as monitor how cars and parts — LRR’s handiwork — are performing.

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In short, Long Road Racing isn’t just interested in building cars. They’re interested in engineering racecars that are consistent lap-to-lap, race-to-race. It’s a meticulous process that can only be appreciated by observing the sheer number of details they pay attention to, and by acknowledging the thorough (and on-going) testing, development, and engineering that goes into every car and part.

And while all this talk of details, data points, and testing run the risk of sounding boring, the product is anything but. When Long Road Racing has done their job right, each factory-fresh ND has been transformed from a fun roadster to a legitimate racecar that performs identically to its sister cars, all for under $60,000 — chump change in motorsports for a car that’s as well engineered as these Cup cars.

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“The only things you change are setup and driver,” summarizes Glenn. And with that, Glenn and his team are the wizards responsible for creating the stage for dynamic, exciting, and close races decided by driver skill, experience, and strategy — not the size of budgets.

Because when it comes down to it, Long Road Racing is really looking back towards what got Glenn and Tom into this business in the first place: accessible racing. With every part and car they build, Long Road Racing shows how thoroughly committed they are to the integrity and ideals of stoking driving passion and grassroots motorsports.






The 11th and 12th rounds of the 2018 season of Global MX-5 Cup racing takes place this weekend at Monticello Motor Club.

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Build

Rough Automobiles

Editor’s note: We’d be in heaven if we had a collection of cars as extensive as Simon Danielsson. He can lay claim to 13 vehicles — mostly rugged trucks — of unique provenances. There’s the firetruck Land Rover Defender 110, a former Swedish troop carrier, a Unimog, and even a former Volvo bus used by the Swedish national bomb squad. Even better? Most of them — the ones that don’t require specialized tires — run BFGs. Here’s how Simon got into collecting these rough automobiles.


 

I think it all started when I was a teenager. My parents drove Land Cruisers, and we had Mitsubishi Pajeros and Land Cruisers in my family since almost forever. One of my relatives was a member of an off-road club, so I bought a Lada Niva when I was 15, which took all the hits a rookie driver could possibly expose a vehicle to. When I was 18, I got my driver’s license in a Land Cruiser 80.

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Several years later, I fell for a Land Rover Series 3 109 from 1978. It was the perfect summer cruiser on the island of Gotland, and that was the beginning of my collection. That specific vehicle is no longer with me, but through Instagram I have managed to find the current owner, which is fun!

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I think that my interest in collecting vehicles comes from liking to source vehicles and making trades; wanting to find the ultimate overland vehicle — which will never happen; and the creative part of planning upgrades and tweaks after finding a vehicle.

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The fleet is constantly growing and trying to pick a favorite vehicle is very difficult, as it’s changing all the time. I’m very excited to see my next project, a Land Rover Lightweight, as it’s the first half-ton in my collection. The 1952 Series 1 is rare and lots of fun to drive; the Defender 90 Puma soft-top is the ultimate summer car; and the Unimog 416 Doka could be the project with most potential, but it’s on the backburner for now. If I had to pick one vehicle to keep today, it would be the Defender 110 300TDi airfield truck.

 


 

Simon’s Current Collection:

Make: Land Rover
Model: Defender 110 HCPU one of a kind firetruck edition
Year: 1999
Comments: An awesome custom model with only 34,000km. Makes for the ultimate overland truck!

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Make: Mercedes-Benz
Model: Sprinter 316 CDI 4x4 - ”blue"
Year: 2002
Comments: Former troop carrier for the Swedish Ministry of Defense. Superb vehicle!

Make: Mercedes-Benz
Model: Sprinter 316 CDI 4x4 - ”sand"
Year: 2002
Comments: Same as above. I managed to buy two from the MoD and have refurbished both of them and given them very nice, new BFGoodrich® All-Terrain T/A KO2s.

Make: Mercedes-Benz
Model: Sprinter 315 CDI 4x4 - ”white"
Year: 2008
Comments: A monster! It drives like a train on the highway, fits a large family, and still has 4x4 and a reduction gear. It will be my first camper interior build project.

Make: Land Rover
Model: Defender 110 Puma hard-top
Year: 2008
Comments: My current travel companion in the French-Italian Alps. I’m running BFGoodrich® Mud-Terrain T/A KM2s, which are great, but better off in warmer climates than Sweden. 

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Make: Land Rover
Model: Defender 130 HCPU
Year: 2002
Comments: This is one badass Defender 130! I’m planning on going black-on-black with a custom setup on the flatbed. This one is going to be amazing!

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Make: Mercedes-Benz
Model: Sprinter 311 CDI 4x4
Year: 2001
Comments:
I sold this one last year, but the following Youtube clip from a road trip in the French-Italian Alps shows what a cargo van can do with a set of KO2s. 

Make: Land Rover
Model: Defender 90 Puma soft-top
Year: 2008
Comments: A lovely Defender in like-new condition. It’s currently the original green color, and I’m considering giving it a custom sand paint color next winter, with a bunch of other upgrades!

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Make: Land Rover
Model: Defender 110 Hard top 300TDi
Year: 1996
Comments: This could be my favorite vehicle. It has an aggressive look, is almost original, and has the most versatile setup with an open box in the rear: it’s long enough to sleep in! This is the most difficult project as the combination of a 110 military green HT body, a 300TDi engine, and having 56,000km on the clock makes it very rare. I don’t want to make any mistakes and ruin anything. I’ve started looking at a portal axle upgrade, but I keep coming back to the idea that I will never regret not making major changes. It’s a keeper for life!

Make: Land Rover
Model: Defender 110 HCPU Heritage Edition
Year: 2000
Comments: It’s been stripped, repainted, refurbed, and upgraded, and it’ll look awesome with its new Heritage paint and teak covered flatbed!

Make: Volvo ”Bomb Squad Bus"
Model: Based on B12M
Year: 2008
Comments: This is going to be an interesting project. It was with the Swedish National Bomb Squad for 9 years. After they finished this custom project and spent €400-500k, they later decided it wasn’t the right thing for them. Well, it’s definitely the right thing for me, as I can fit a Defender 90 in the back!

Make: Mercedes-Benz
Model: Unimog 416 Doka
Year: 1978
Comments: A former fire truck. It’s a future project that could possibly become an overland vehicle (for when I have kids), or just an awesome family cruiser! 

Make: Land Rover 
Model: Series 1
Year: 1952
Comments: A collector’s vehicle and fun summer ride. It has lived almost all its life at Linköping Airport in Sweden. It was found hidden in a storage facility at the airport in 2005 by a janitor. Since it was in storage for many years and rarely left the airport at all, the current 45,000km should be accurate. It was delivered in fire truck red in 1953, and later hand rolled (!!!) in green, and therefore in need of a paint job — but it’s great as is!

 


 

Follow Simon’s Instagram for a deeper look at his overland and off-road vehicle collection.

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In Focus: Larry Chen

Editor’s note: If we’re honest with ourselves, we all want visual proof when we really send it. All the better to brag, share, and marvel at the things we do. We’re celebrating that with In Focus, a series with the pro photographers and videographers that document the off-road world. Check out the full series here.

Today, we’ve got arguably the most recognizable name in motorsports and automotive culture photography joining us: Larry Chen.

 


 

For those that don’t know, who are you, and what do you do?

My name is Larry Chen and I take pictures and tell stories about car culture for a living. 

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I like to take the natural approach when it comes to actually capturing the photo, as well as the subjects that I am photographing. For example, I mostly shoot with natural light. When it comes to what I like to shoot, I always search out natural and genuine car culture moments in our time. It could be a motorsports festival, or just a local car gathering. Everything that has to do with cars interests me. 

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For example, when I go to other countries, I do my best to go to local car meets and hang out with the locals. These are some of my favorite stories I've ever written:

 

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 Do you have a favorite moment or interaction from your work?

There are so many moments that I get to experience, many of which I don't actually get to capture with my camera. It's hard to pinpoint one single moment, but plenty are significant enough in my life for me to remember them every now and then when sitting in traffic or lying in bed.

In your opinion, what makes a Larry Chen photo? How is your work unique/different from all the other folks shooting cars?

There is no difference in my work versus everyone else's in terms of quality. Every photographer does develop their own style, and I think I've developed a style that is true to my subjects: the cars, the racing, and the people behind the scenes.

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Putting in the time and the effort to search out for new things to shoot is what keeps me going.

You shoot everything related to car culture. What is different or unique about shooting off-road? What do you look forward to when it comes to off-road?

On-road and off-road are really two different worlds, but the passion for both are equal. I am so lucky that I've been able to really dive head first into off-road photography. The community is great, and they have really accepted me with open arms.

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How did you get more into shooting off-road?

I always knew it was a world that I wanted to explore because of how dynamic the shooting is. Generally speaking, with road-going cars, they don't leave the ground. With off-road, it's 3D: vehicles are going up and down and catching air every now and then. I took a plunge by building my own off-road vehicle: a 6MT 2007 Toyota FJ Cruiser.

What are 5 unexpected things you've learned while shooting off-road?

  1. The dust and dirt. It's something that I am used to now, but it's also something that I really have to be careful about in terms of damaging my gear, as well as my health.
  2. You have to essentially run your own race to be able to follow off-road racing. Getting to the good spots at the right time is 95 percent of the battle when it comes to off-road photography.
  3. Watch where you step in the desert, because it's very easy to step on a used catheter.
  4. Always have an escape plan when shooting off-road. It's just too easy for the trucks to overshoot a turn, or even flip over. Shooting off-road can be super dangerous.
  5. Whatever you do, don't get stuck. Play it safe, because the last thing you want is to miss the race because you are stuck in the sand, or broken down somewhere along the race course.

 

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What off-road events have been your favorite so far? Why?

Baja 1000, San Felipe 250, Mint 400, King of the Hammers, Crandon off-road championships, Easter Jeep Safari… the list goes on. There is so much to do and so much to shoot in off-road. I especially love shooting in Mexico because of the culture, the food, and the people.

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What's the dumbest thing you've ever done to get a shot?

Pretty much everything I do is dumb, but not dangerous. You just have to always overestimate where the car is going. I've underestimated a few times, and I've learned from it.

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You've shot so many things — what's left on your bucket list?

I still have yet to shoot Dakar and a Formula 1 race. Other than that, the list is really endless. There is just not enough time to shoot everything I want.

What's your top tip for people wanting to take better photos of their rides?

Go out there and do it. It's a good idea to wait for sunrise or sunset, because the softer light usually makes the car look better.

 


 

For a look into Larry’s life as an automotive photographer, make sure to check out his Instagram at @larry_chen_foto.

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Build

Joshua’s 2017 Subaru BRZ

Editor’s note: Like many, Joshua Sy got into cars through video games — the very first Gran Turismo game, specifically. Everything about cars — their histories, the technical aspects — appealed to him. Now, he’s picked up his own affordable, driver-focused, and fun sports car: a 2017 Subaru BRZ.

 


 

I chose my BRZ because of its aesthetics and its driver-focused design. Aside from that, it is one of my affordable dream cars, and I made it a goal to get my very own ever since I found out about this car.        

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I really love how the car looks right now, but I also love how it handles. The thrill of taking it to the canyons and feeling the car grip through the turns at speed is really gratifying. There's nothing else like it, and it really shows what it was made for.

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So far, I’ve put on a Tein Flex Z suspension; Injen SES catback exhaust; Voltex Type 2 wing; Aeroblitz Racing front splitter; Rocketbunny V1 side skirts and rear valance; Rays 57CR wheels; and BFGoodrich® g-Force Comp-2 A/S tires.              

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I decided to put Comp-2 A/S tires on the car because I wanted tires that could offer longevity and grip for what I was going to do with the car; daily driving, with the occasional canyon/mountain runs. I am running 245/40/17s all around on the car.

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The only I'm surprised by is how slow it is! Haha! Jokes aside, I'm really surprised by how nimble and driver-friendly it is. It really is a good sports car for learning how to really drive, due to the fact it has just enough horsepower to have fun, and not too much that you’ll get yourself into major trouble. Right now, I mostly drive my BRZ around curvy roads, but I do want to take it to the track soon because I'm really interested to learn how to drive this car at its very limit.

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As for other modifications, I'm planning on touchingthe engine next, specifically the headers and getting a tune for it, then adding a flex fuel kit.          

 


           

Check out Joshua’s blue BRZ on Instagram. Photographs courtesy of Charles Hoehaver.

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Build

Ivan’s 2016 Subaru WRX

Editor’s note: A family car will never truly be a racecar, but Team Hybrid’s Rodolfo “Ivan” Manio has found a way to make those competing needs overlap in his WRX build. And while it looks fast, Manio hasn't touched the powertrain yet — hence the name for his Subie: Slobaru.

 


 

Back in the Philippines, my uncle had a Mitsubishi Lancer “box-type” and he pretty much built it from ground up. With him, it was that car, and then another project build, one after the other. I was 10 years old, and that got me pretty much interested in cars.

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When I bought my WRX, my wife and I had been looking for a car for a day. We decided to go straight to a Subaru dealership instead of driving around from dealership to dealership, and three hours later, we drove home with our first Subaru. 

I chose the 2016 Subaru WRX because I’d always wanted an AWD race car. I’ve wanted a Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution IX since it first came out, but I couldn’t afford it at the time. Now, finding a decent, unmolested Evo IX is a farfetched idea, so I chose its longtime rival: Subaru.

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At the time, I had been out of the car scene for about six years. I’d sold my first build after losing interest, but I had met Team Hybrid’s Nevada Chapter Director Archie Concon and longtime member Charleston Penesa at a local car show, and at the end of 2016, I decided I was ready to step it back up, so I joined the team.

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Up to now, my WRX’s exterior modifications have been pretty basic. I started with an AEM intake, H&R springs, gold machine-finished AodHan AH-01 wheels, a VIS V2 carbon fiber hood, and a custom Rays Factory wing which I got from my best friend Charleston Penesa. I color-matched the deck of the wing, the foglight bezel, and the all-around STI lip kit to give my WRX a unique and clean look. I’m also running BFGoodrich® g-Force COMP-2 A/S tires (255/35/ZR18) because I wanted something for daily driving that can handle and grip the road, dry or wet.

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The interesting about this car is it may look fast, but the engine is bone stock. I get a kick out of when people wonder what I have under the hood. I’ll get to the engine mods in the future, but for now, I’ll enjoy putting miles on it first. With just the stock engine and suspension, I can already have fun in the corners with the handling and the torque.

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My car isn’t quite where I want it to be, and I know I need to improve more things. However, it’s very humbling when I get compliments from strangers on the road, at the gas station, or even in a drive-through window. Having a short conversation with someone that admires your hard work is truly a heart-warming feeling. 

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The next steps for this car will be in the interior. I want to do something that no one has done in this model, but major modifications will take time. “Rome was not built in a day,” as they say.

Although this build is far from being completed, I’d like to thank a few people, first and foremost our founder and president James Lin, for always leading by example and consistently giving and showing me Hybrid Luv from the beginning. I also want to thank my chapter director Archie Concon for always being a great leader and a great friend. Thank you to Charleston Penesa for always being there for me and guiding me on my build. Thank you to Adrian Oba and Jhay Ar del Castillo for always being there for me as well.

To my Nevada Chapter family and Hybridz worldwide: let's continue making import and Hybrid history. Thank you to my wife Kristine for supporting me on everything I do, and to my kids: I love you all. Lastly, plenty of Hybrid Luv to our team title sponsors: BFGoodrich, Meguiar's, K&N Filters, AEM Inatakes, AMSOIL, Whiteline, Password:JDM, NRG Innovations, Mishimoto and Optima Batteries.  If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go with a legendary team.

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See more of this WRX build on Instagram at @1slobaru2h8. Photographs by Michael Russell.

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Build

Jayro’s 2014 Polaris RZR XP4 1000

Editor’s note: There’s performance to go with looks on Jayro Rodriguez’s Polaris RZR.

 


 

I got into off-roading when I was young. I started riding a quad, then I moved to Jeeps, Yamaha Rhinos, and I finally ended up with a Polaris RZR. I believe Polaris makes the best looking four-seater side-by-side. Even after a few years, I still think it looks sexy, and I love what they are capable of. You can do anything from high speed runs, to rock crawling, to mudding, all with one machine.

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I’ve modified almost everything on my RZR: the roll cage and roof; the seats; the suspension; the sound system; lights; doors; wheels and tires; and the drivetrain. When I got my RZR, they had Maxxis tires on them, and the they were probably down to 50% tread within the first 400 miles.

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I had BFGoodrich® tires on my truck, and I was impressed with the quality and how long they lasted, considering I would tow with the truck. So I decided to go with BFGoodrich® Mud-Terrain T/A KM2s (30x9.5R15) for my RZR because I didn’t want to be stranded out in the middle of nowhere because of a flat. They have almost 2000 miles on them and are just now starting to show wear. I ride everywhere with them, from river beds to late night runs to the grocery store. 

I love everything about my Polaris. It hasn’t disappointed. 

 


 

Check out more Jayro’s RZR on Instagram at @jayro.86.

 

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Adventure

Mustang Week 2018

This week in Myrtle Beach, SC, there’s going to be a little something extra in air: the sound of V8 motors and the smell of gasoline and tires. It’s Mustang Week 2018, and we’ll be bringing all this pony car goodness to the Garage.

September 4

BFGoodrich® Tires Autocross School
Meet-n-Greet

September 5
BFGoodrich® Tires Track Day

September 7
Mustang Week Car Show

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Adventure

Mustang Week 2018: Car Show

A little rain didn't deter Mustang Week attendees from checking out the car show at the Myrtle Beach Convention Center. Inside, show cars were lined up for judging, while outside, plenty of Mustangs (of various vintages) converged in the parking lot for showing and sharing.

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Download our photos from the car show here.

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