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Richard’s 2017 Honda Civic Type R

Editor’s note: The latest generation Civic Type R is distinctive looking, to say the least. But with its combination of futuristic looks and outsized performance, there’s a chance this car will be every bit as iconic as past Type Rs. Richard Carcabuso of Team Hybrid’s San Diego Chapter talks to us about his own eye-catching yellow CTR.

 


 

I have been a car enthusiast for over 26 years. In high school, I worked on cars, did motor swaps on my own 1992 Toyota MR2 Turbo, and spent many weeks modifying and driving imports.

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It has been a dream of mine to own a Type R ever since I first saw one in 2000. I wasn’t able to purchase one then, and bought a 2000 Toyota Celica instead. However, four weeks before the release of the FK8 Civic Type R, I contacted a dealer. He said that if I wanted to be able to purchase the car, I needed to be there as soon as the CTR was delivered off the trailer. Once they called me to notify me of its arrival, I was there in four minutes, ready to purchase the car without even test driving it. 

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Because of its rarity, low production number plates are sought after, and my car is number 339. I also wanted to preserve as much of its unique character as possible, and I chose to modify items that would keep its driving characteristics while giving it some of my own personal style.

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I have HRE FF15 wheels with BFGoodrich® g-Force COMP-2 A/S tires, a Mishimoto intake and oil catchcan, and a Greddy SP exhaust. I also had the car wrapped in satin yellow to pay homage to the Type R legacy.

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I still want to get the ECU re-flashed by Hondata and install a thermal-wrapped USR downpipe, frontpipe, and turbo blanket. I am also looking for Mishimoto to complete their intercooler and a Greddy oil cooler. I don’t think I will ever be done with this car as new products come to market. 

It’s amazing to see how many people are shocked and amazed at the CTR’s design and my choice of color. Many people don’t know that it is wrapped and believe it to be a stock color. After that they notice the rims and exhaust. 

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As for me, I love the power of this new 2.0 L turbo motor, and I love the balance and precision that Honda has designed into this track monster! The design is aggressive yet balanced in its look. My goal is to keep it looking iconic and timeless, and to continue improving on its ability to be tracked and daily driven. 

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Thanks to our founder and president James Lin; Team Hybrid management, especially San Diego Chapter Director Scott Dean for all the positive encouragement; the Hybrid Family especially San Diego Chapter Hybridz for being such a positive influence on the import tuner community; the beautiful Hybrid Hunnyz; and plenty of Hybrid Luv to our team title sponsors: BFGoodrich, Meguiar's, AEM Intakes, AMSOIL, Whiteline, Password:JDM, NRG Innovations, Mishimoto, and Optima Batteries.  If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go with a team.






See more of Richard's CTR on Instagram at @slicksta637. Photography courtesy of Efrain Garay.

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Build

Don’s 1988 Jeep Grand Wagoneer

Editor’s note: When we met Don Scott at Easter Jeep Safari 2018, we’d heard his Grand Wagoneer on classic BFGoodrich® All-Terrain T/A KOs was a little different. As it turns out, this advocate for bio-diesel had stuffed a Cummins 4BT diesel into the engine bay. Here’s what he had to say about his passion for Jeeping and the benefits of bio-diesel.

 


 

My desire for Jeeping started in 1979, when I was six years old.  Family vacation took us to Telluride, Colorado.  From the main street of Telluride, you can see Bridal Veil Falls and the old mining road going up over Black Bear Pass.  I wanted to go up there and explore so badly, but we didn’t have 4WD back then. Adventure denied! 

So the first thing I did after graduating from engineering school and getting my first real job, was to buy a black 1988 Grand Wagoneer. In 1998, I crossed Black Bear Pass in that Jeep. Then I proceeded to drive it every other place I could, from the top of 14,000ft peaks in Colorado, to Key West. My previous trip to Moab was in that Jeep, as well as a trip to Baja as part of the first International Jeep Jamboree.  Through 200,000 miles, I rebuilt the AMC 360 in that Jeep twice.  After the second Gulf War, when gas rose past $2/gallon, my go-everywhere, do-everything wagon became very expensive to operate.

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So in 2003, I bought a 1984 Dodge crew cab that had been converted to the diesel drivetrain from a ’92 W350. It was more truck than I needed, but that 6BT got 20 mpg.  It became more economical transportation compared to my Wagoneer. All my outdoor adventures were synonymous with my appreciation for the environment.  As an engineer, I worked to protect water quality. Even though my big Dodge got better miles-per-gallon, I was still concerned that the environmental damage from petroleum was greater than all the good I was doing professionally to protect clean water. In 2006, I started running my Dodge on used cooking oil to free myself from the guilt associated with fossil fuel addiction. It wasn’t long before I made the switch from vegetable oil to biodiesel and went to work for the national Biodiesel Board as a full-time advocate for clean energy.

The reliability of the Cummins 6BT along with the fuel economy and ability to burn biodiesel, led me to begin collecting parts to put a Cummins 4BT in my trusty old Wagoneer. In 2008, we took the well-used — but still running-perfectly — diesel engine and GM automatic transmission out of a retired Hostess delivery van. With the help of an adapter from Novak, we mated the delivery truck transmission to the original Jeep transfer case. The Jeep is otherwise original. 

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The very few modifications beyond that included building a custom bracket for the AC compressor. We added an air charge cooler from a 2003, European-spec Grand Cherokee diesel. The Wagoneer now gets 20mpg reliably in town or at speed up to 80 mph on the highway, and it’ll get 28mpg if we keep the speed in check. This effectively doubled the fuel economy from when it was powered by a gasoline V8. 

 


 

We brought a maroon Wagoneer to Moab for Easter Jeep Safari. It belonged to my good friend, Paul, who joined us in Moab. Paul restores vintage Mustangs for a living. He had more time in the shop and he copied my idea by putting the diesel in his maroon Wagoneer.  I then bought it from him, as my daily driver, which it has been for 10 years. Unlike the used diesel engine in the maroon Jeep, we completely rebuilt a brand new 4BT for the black Jeep. The parts are just sitting around waiting for their day to get installed.

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Paul and I have also done 6BT conversions in a ’76 Ramcharger convertible and a ’72 Dodge Power Wagon, and we are completing a 4BT conversion in a ’78 Scout. Now that Cummins is offering crate engines directed to consumers for repower projects, I am excited to use one of their new engines. We haven’t decided exactly what we might build yet. We are considering another Wagoneer, my Forward Control Jeep, or something totally different.

We’re believers in biodiesel because it is vital to our economy. I am proud of my role, which is primarily quantifying the environmental impacts. Biodiesel is a small percentage of diesel fuel used in the US today, but every US diesel engine manufacturer approves biodiesel blends. On an annual basis, biodiesel can reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 25 million tons, and at the same time, support 64,000 jobs paying $2.5 billion in wages and creating $11 billion in economic activity. 

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Biodiesel is a wonderful example of how doing good things for the economy also does good things for the environment. It is a win-win situation. The main thing that is holding us back is lack of awareness. Our story is so good, people tend to be skeptical. If we can help people understand the potential, it can become really powerful to the economy. 






Learn about another biodiesel advocate, Tom Holm of the EcoTrek Foundation.

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Build

The Crosstrek Desert Racer

Editor’s note: Subaru has a rich history in rally and rallycross, but it’s not necessarily a name you’d associate with desert racing. However, when Dustin and Parker Grabowski of Grabowski Brothers Racing decided to build a Class 5 Unlimited car, they wanted to push the envelope. They partnered with Crawford Performance and built a Subaru-powered beast. Cody Woodruff, the marketing manager for bot Graboski Brothers and Crawford Performance, took a moment to tell us about this unique racecar.

 


 

The Crosstrek Desert Racer story began when our team was in search of a motor that had the durability and power to push our Class 5 Unlimited car faster than the competition. Being the heaviest car in the class — just shy of 3800 pounds when race ready — we knew we had our work cut out for us. We looked into several motors before deciding to run a Subaru engine. We searched all around Southern California until we found Quirt Crawford of Crawford Performance.

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He is best known for his work on the famous Ken Block Gymkhana 1 and Gymkhana 2 cars. Quirt has decades of experience in the racing industry and has pushed the limits of the boxer engine. He undoubtedly knows how to build powerful and durable engines. The Crosstrek name was chosen because it was the vehicle in the Subaru lineup that hit all the marks of an off-road build. 

Our Crosstrek doesn’t look like your typical Class 5 Unlimited car. It’s heavily built with all of the best parts available. Our car features parts off of Class 1 and Class 10 cars, such as our rear trailing arms and heim joints. It outweighs our competitors by over 1000 pounds, which you can tell just by looking at our car. 

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We also run up to 37” BFGoodrich® Tires depending on the race, which has never been done before on a Class 5 Unlimited. Our race team has always run BFGoodrich® Tires. They are the best in the business. They grip the best and last the longest. No Flats = Races Won. Neal and Mike Grabowski — Dustin and Parker’s dads, respectively — won the 1996 SCORE International Class 5 Unlimited Championship on BFGs. 

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But the number one thing that sets us apart from others in our class is the Subaru boxer engine. We are the first Class 5 Unlimited to be powered by a Subaru. All of this makes us stand out, and people don’t understand how the Subaru motor can perform this well on such a heavy platform.

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This build is nothing but special to us. Everything that sets our car apart from others is the reason why we love it. This build is unique, fast, and revolutionary. We have had to work out a few kinks once we put the boxer engine in it. It just has so much power and torque. “There’s just so much torque,” says Quirt Crawford. “It has a transmission from a Class 1 car and those cars make 700HP, but this one was hurting parts of the transmission, the CV joints — parts that are usually never a problem.”

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We’ve also never seen a Class 5 Unlimited car go through the rough as fast as we are going, which has caused issues in and around itself. With it being a beam front end, we are limited in our front suspension, so we’ve had to work closely with KING Shocks in order to dial in our shock tuning. This will forever be an ongoing process as we get faster and faster.

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With the Crosstrek, we have several goals in mind:

  • We want to bring life back to Class 5 Unlimited as a whole by using our unique car as a marketing tool to increase engagement in the community.
  • We want to be consistent and beat our class competitors.
  • We want to finish the Baja 1000.
  • And we would love to win a race overall and prove Class 5 Unlimited can be as fast as Class 10 with the right setup, team, and drivers.

 




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Technical Specifications:

  • Chassis: Desert Dynamics
  • Body: Subaru Crosstrek; Victory Race Cars
  • Graphic Design: Matthew Law
  • Vinyl: Hyper Blue by Sign Pro
  • Engine: Naturally Aspirated FB 2.5L Subaru Boxer Engine
  • Engine Tuning: Crawford Performance
  • Cooling: CBR
  • Exhaust: Crawford Custom
  • Plumbing: Crawford Custom
  • Transmission: Albins
  • Driveline: 935 Pro Am Axels & CV’s
  • Brakes: Pro AM; Front – Four Piston / Rear – Six Piston
  • Wheels: Pro Am Forged Wheels
  • Tires: 35” BFGoodrich® All-Terrain T/A KDR2+
  • Wheel Base: 105”
  • Front Suspension: Trailing Arms w/ 14” Travel KING Shock Bypass & Coil Over
  • Rear Suspension: Trailing Arms w/ 18” Travel KING Shocks, Bypass & Coil Over
  • Lights: GG Lighting
  • Steering: Howe 2 ½” RAM
  • Wiring: Jax Motorsports / James Lyn (MoTeC)
  • Navigation: LeadNav / Lowrance
  • Communication: PCI Radios
  • Seats: Cobra Motorsport
  • Safety: PRP Belts / Safe Craft Flame Out System
  • Fuel Cell: Harmon 34 Gallon
  • Weight: 3800lbs Race Ready

  


 

Catch the Crosstrek Desert Racer as it campaigns in the SCORE International, BITD, MORE, and SNORE series this year. It’ll run in the Baja 500 next week (May 30-June 3); Vegas to Reno (August 15-18); PCI Race Radios 300 (September 29); Baja 1000; and McKenzie’s Rage at the River.

Follow @grabowskibrothersracing for more boxer-powered goodness.

 

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Build

Frank’s 2014 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon

Editor’s note: Wranglers aren’t necessarily unique around the Garage, but you might recognize this one in particular, especially if you’ve been paying attention to BFGoodrich® Mud-Terrain T/A® KM3 announcements. Frank Lopez, an adventure and astrophotographer and owner of this Jeep, talks to us about overlanding, his favorite trips, and the KM3.

 


 

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What got you interested in overlanding?

It was my love for traveling that got me interested in overlanding, as well as my passion for photography.

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What made you choose your Jeep?

It might sound corny, but the Jeep Wrangler has been my dream car for quite some time. The Wrangler is synonymous with adventure, the outdoors, and everything that has to do with exploring via 4x4. I’ve owned two Jeeps, and I’m sure I’ll own many more.

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What do you love about it? What modifications have you made to it?

I love that I can go anywhere I want with my Jeep, and I love the places I’ve seen only because I was able to get there with my Jeep. I’ve done a fair amount of work, but my favorite is my Ursa Minor Camper known as a J30. With less than 300 made, it’s quite the head turner. The J30 is made to look similar to an OEM hardtop, but it is actually a pop-top camper able to sleep two adults.

 

You don’t need all the fancy gear that is associated with overlanding. You just a sense of adventure, a plan, and of course, it doesn’t hurt to have a great set of tires.”

 

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What tires are you running? Why did you decide on them?

I am currently running the newest BFGoodrich® Mud-Terrain T/A® KM3 (37x12.50 R17). I need something that can handle the tough terrain I travel on, as well as something reliable.

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I started running BFGs when I bought my first Jeep. It was almost second nature for my Jeep to always run BFG. I had KM2s for several years, and after plenty of roadtrips, I decided to make the switch to KO2s. Since I was driving long distances to get to my destinations,  I wanted a better all-terrain tire, and to help with the long drives and road noise.

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The first thing I noticed when I hit the road with my KM3s was how quiet they were compared to my old KM2s — almost as quiet as the KO2s. The other noticeable difference was the tougher sidewall. When in aired-down situations, it’s nice to know I can use the sidewalls to do some crawling on rocks without fear of causing damage. 

 

“The first thing I noticed when I hit the road with my KM3s was how quiet they were compared to my old KM2s — almost as quiet as the KO2s.”

 

Any notable journeys/adventures you've been on? Favorite spots you've hit?

Last year, I drove up to Idaho to witness the solar eclipse.  I crossed through five states and drove a total of 2,987 miles in nine days, all to be within the line of totality. It was quite the experience. I’d like to say it was a once in a lifetime experience, but I’m hoping I can make another trip like that when the next solar eclipse happens. 

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My favorite spots are usually those I’ve sworn not to share the locations of, but they are always enjoyed with a great group of like-minded friends.

What would be your top tip for someone interested in overlanding?

You don’t need all the fancy gear that is associated with overlanding. You just a sense of adventure, a plan, and of course, it doesn’t hurt to have a great set of tires. Having a plan is optional, though.  






Follow Frank's Jeep on Instagram at @mr.franklopez or visit his website.

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Adventure

Robin's 2017 Toyota Tacoma TRD

Editor’s note: While we were in Moab for Easter Jeep Safari, we ran into Robin Brooks. You might recognize her from last year, when we met her at Texas Unlimited Off-Road Expo. Driving the obstacle course at Texas Motor Speedway was her first off-road experience behind the wheel, and since then, her passion for leaving pavement has only grown.

 


 

My husband Christopher and I love the outdoors, off-roading, camping, hiking, and such. We purchased a Turtleback off-road trailer to make our camping experience a little more comfortable. The trailer was ready for pick up in Arizona around the same time that Overland Expo West 2016 was going on, so we planned our trip so we could attend and camp with the Herd of Turtles.

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This was a great experience because we could watch other Turtleback trailer owners set up and learn tricks from them. While there, I got an invite to a ladies night out event where I first got to hear @Charlene Bower speak. I also befriended a fellow Okie in Alisha Driggers. By friending Alisha on Facebook, I got a pop-up of people you may know and voila! There was Charlene Bower!

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After driving the obstacle course at the Texas Unlimited Off-Road Expo in 2017, I wanted to get off-road as the driver instead of just the passenger, which was exactly what my husband was hoping for. Shortly after we got back from the expo, Charlene posted about the Ladies Offroad Network (LON) Convention. I signed up, and it was UNFORGETTABLE!

It was a huge eye-opener as to what women are capable of! I learned so much, including how to use different recovery gear, how to do a 360 check, change a tire, how to use a Hi-lift, how a Pull Pal works, mapping skills, and so much more! Not to mention amazing friendships with ladies that have the same passion as me.

After I got back from the convention, I went on a mission to find the perfect off-road vehicle and daily driver. I test drove both Jeeps and Toyotas, and the Tacoma won! I bought my 2017 Toyota Tacoma TRD pickup in August, and I haven’t looked back! I had the dealership install a 3” level kit, Fuel Wheels, BFGoodrich® All-Terrain T/A KO2s, an ADD HoneyBadger bumper, and install the WARN winch that I won from the Ladies Offroad Network September giveaway.

I personally installed BudBuilt rock sliders, Lazer Star ditch lights that I won from the LON 12 day of Christmas giveaway using SDHQ off-road ditch light mounts, and then my CB radio. I must give a shoutout to my wonderful husband for assisting me in these installs and teaching me what tools I needed and how to use them. And I will continue to do all modification installs myself. The proud feeling of achievement is so worth doing the work, no matter how difficult.

My latest trip was to Easter Jeep Safari in Moab, Utah, thanks to Charlene Bowers. When I called her to discuss upcoming events, she suggested EJS be my first one of the year, despite the fact I don’t have a Jeep. I am so happy she convinced me to go! This was my first ladies road trip with my friend Jessy Greenland, and we had an absolute blast! Moab was AMAZING! I was very impressed with how my Tacoma maneuvered and my KO2 tires worked great! My reasons for requesting KO2s when I bought my Tacoma were, 1) great reviews, and 2) BFGoodrich supports LON, and I am very loyal to those who support me and my LON family. Being part of the Ladies Offroad Network has truly changed my life for the better! The women involved are so supportive and non-judgmental! It doesn’t matter if you’re an old pro, a newbie, or what you drive — we are in this together!

During Easter Jeep Safari, I learned to two-foot drive, not take my hands off the steering wheel, and to take things slow and easy. I started out a little rough, but by the end of the week I was much more comfortable with what I could do.

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This year is going to be a year of learning! I have applied for the Ladies Offroad Challenge, and I hope to make it to the top 10. I am also signed up for the 2018 LON Convention in August, and I’m going to do as much off-road learning as possible. My future goal is the 2019 Rebelle Rally, and who knows what else!

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Adventure

Dirt Every Day

Editor’s note: We caught up with Fred Williams, an auto journalist and TV show host with Dirt Every Day and The Motor Trend Network, at the Garage in Moab, Utah, during Easter Jeep Safari. He’s got a long history with BFGoodrich, a unique perspective on off-roading, and some fightin’ words for the guys driving on tarmac.

 


 

On Becoming An Auto Journalist

I got my first Jeep in high school. It was a $600 CJ5, and from there, it just kind of snowballed. When I got out of school, I was traveling out West and I met a guy that wrote for the off-road magazines I read as a kid. I asked how he got to be a journalist, and at the time, I wasn’t asking for a job, I was just curious. But he said, Oh, you wanna write for a magazine? I know a guy. And he called this guy and he said, send a writing sample, so that’s how I got started.

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I like Jeeps and I like trucks, but even today, I never claim to be an expert in this off-road stuff. I just know enough of the right people in the industry, for example: if I don’t know how a tire is made, or how a diesel engine works, I can find out.

I quickly learned my job as an automotive journalist was translating because if you talk to engineer nerds, they’ll tell you all this stuff that doesn’t make sense to the normal man. So I’d take that information and turn it around and make it so my mom could understand it.

On Why Off-Roading Is the Best

Off-road is better than drag racing, or anything on asphalt. That stuff is boring ‘cause it’s flat! It’s only two dimensions: left and right, forward and back, where off-roading has up and down. We have hill climbs and crazy descents and rock crawling, and when you throw in dirt, it just makes it more exciting.

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Tire smoke is interesting, but dust and dirt and rocks flying everywhere is MORE exciting. You can go fast, you can go slow, you can have super technical stuff, you can have mud, sand, snow, rocks whatever the terrain. There’s just more to it than boring old asphalt.

On Making Videos About Off-Roading

My buddy Dave is my co-host, and we work on projects together, we get angry at each other, we work it all out, we finish the thing, we go four-wheeling and have fun. It’s like real life. We don’t have 30 mechanics that come in to finish the thing. And we’ll go out on the trail and break and the engine will catch on fire, and it’s reality. It’s not staged reality. But we try to make the show appeal to kids. We don’t swear, we’re not about attitude or competition — we just want to get kids excited to play with trucks. 

At the end of the day, we’re just trying to have a good time, play with trucks, and show people that it’s fun to do.

On Getting Kids Excited

For a while, the future of the automotive scene seemed bleak because kids just wanted to play on their phones, and I’m sure there’s still a lot of that, but I’m just like, Look, go buy a cheap Jeep or Toyota, and go play in the dirt. Don’t worry about buying 40” BFGs today, you’ll be able to do that later. Just go have fun, get stuck, fix things. I mean, it’s great there’s a new $40,000 Wrangler, but not everybody can afford that.

At the end of the day, we’re just trying to have a good time, play with trucks, and show people that it’s fun to do.

On Why Off-Roading Sometimes Sucks

You spend a lot of money, you bust up your knuckles, and it’s a greasy, stinky hobby, but what’s the alternative? Frisbee? Sure Frisbee sounds like a good option some days when I have a truck broken and axles torn out, but I can’t get it out of me. There are times when I think I won’t do the off-road thing anymore, but I’ll see something and I’ll say, Ooh, I want one of those.

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My worst addiction is I’ll get on Craigslist and look at cheap 4x4s and think, Oh I need that. I can put one-tons underneath it, an LS, a roll cage, a winch, and then it’ll be awesome. I don’t’ remember how much work goes into projects, I just see the end goal and then I end up dragging more old junk home.

On His First Tires

The first time I ever bought tires, I went to a Land Rover dealership that had 4 BFGoodrich tires that had been on a Camel Trophy Land Rover or something, and I bought those used tires for $50 a piece. They weren’t much bigger than stock, but it didn’t matter. I had an aggressive mud tire, and it made that thing so cool.  The Jeep would barely run, and I spent all my time working on it, but those BFGs made the whole thing rad.

I mean, knobby tires make anything look cooler. Little kids will point at any lifted truck and go, MONSTER TRUCK! And I’m like, Yeah! I’m driving a monster truck. It doesn’t matter whether it’s on 31” or 42” tires.

In my job, I have to drive and test lots of different tires so it wouldn’t be right for me to pick one favorite tire, but that being said, when I started with at the magazine, BFGoodrich came out with the Krawler tire, and I thought that tire just looked and worked so well. I remember meeting Gary Enterline (@Dr. Dirt), the Father of the Krawler, and so I have always had an affinity for the BFG brand. It’s known worldwide for desert racing, competition rock crawling, Ultra4, or some having All-Terrains for driving in the snow to go skiing. I’m fond of the BFGoodrich brand because I have history with it, and I’ve always met really exciting people who work there or race for them. They’re just a good company, and they’re into the same sort of thing as me: getting people into the dirt.






For more, follow Fred on Instagram at @4xfredwilliams and watch the show at Motor Trend.

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Build

Adam’s 2016 Dodge Ram Rebel

Editor’s note: Adam Ruby is a wildlife photographer who lives in the Canadian Rockies. He recently swapped his Jeep for a black Dodge Ram Rebel. The first thing he did when he bought the Ram? He swapped on new BFGoodrich® All-Terrain T/A KO2s.

 


 

I need my truck to be able to take me anywhere that I want.  Of course, there are some areas that I can’t expect my truck to take me, but I need it to be tough and reliable. More importantly, I need my tires to be reliable.  You can have the biggest and toughest truck on earth, but if you don’t have good rubber you may as well park it. I used to use other tires on my 2011 Jeep Wrangler Sahara. I loved the Jeep, but I needed more.  

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I wanted a smaller pickup that was good on gas and great off-road, and this truck just seemed to make the cut all around. I had done some research on the Ram Rebel, and I loved the adjustable air suspension. The interior is also amazing: heated seats, heated steering wheel, loads of room, touch screen, navigation, etc. Even the trim is awesome.  It literally has everything I need, including the power. A 5.7L Hemi is plenty for me.  

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I used to have BFGs on my old 2000 Ford F-150, and I loved them. I always wanted them again, so when I bought the truck, I immediately bought new BFGs. From the construction, to the price, to the durability, these tires have it all.  I have been through some nasty weather with these tires during the winter in the Rocky Mountains in Canada, and I am still alive to talk about it.  I am a very safe driver, but without these tires, I can’t honestly say I would be here to talk about them. 

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In addition to the tires, I have done some mods to the truck.  I bought a Bulldog canopy from Cap It in Kelowna, BC, Canada, and had that installed back in March 2018.  I knew that I would be building a camper/bunk setup in the bed, so I got on that right away.  I just finished all the hardwood flooring, the framing and the bunk build.  I have a 7-inch mattress, real hardwood flooring, and a 3-by-1.5-foot drawer under my bunk.  I can remove the platform for the rest of the area that is stored under the main bunk.  This allows me to sleep anywhere park the truck.  I have the windows tinted, but it’s not enough.  I plan to make them as dark as possible so it’s not visible to anyone while I’m camping in there — just in case I have to crash in a Walmart parking lot.  

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I will be installing a Thule Roof Rack and Roof Pod in the next few weeks. As for other mods, I bought the Rebel because I didn’t want to have to do a lift or anything else.  Aside from installing a light bar and the stuff I already mentioned, I honestly don’t think I need anything more.

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Follow Adam’s work on Instagram at @adamrubyphotography.

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Adventure

Long Trails on Hell’s Revenge

Editor’s note: Spencer Daines is the son of Travis Daines and the jack-of-all-trades behind Jeepfreeks content. He spent most of his time shooting video during Easter Jeep Safari, but he managed to get away for a day on the trails — even though his rig isn’t exactly set up for hardcore off-roading. Afterwards, we found him working on his Cherokee in the Garage.

 


 

My daily is a stock ‘99 XJ Cherokee with 200,000 miles and suspension wear to show it. The only mod is a custom front bumper I made two days before EJS 2018.

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During this trip I decided I would start upgrading my XJ, so doing the Hell’s Revenge trail was like a last hurrah for the stock setup. Hell’s Revenge is a very scenic trail, and many people take it for granted as being an easy trail. But in a stock vehicle, it’s very technical, and in my opinion, that’s the best way to enjoy the trail.

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There were obstacles on the trail where I only had one line I could make it through because I don’t have a gas tank skid plate. I would have to put both rear tires on skinny rocks, right over a sharp rock in the center just waiting to put a hole in my tank if I slipped. And my exhaust from the cat back was ripped off by a rock ledge.

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But the best part was that I did the trail on BFGoodrich® Long Trail T/A Tour tires (235x70x15). They gripped the rock really well, and I had zero instances where the tires slipped or chirped, which is quite impressive for street tires.

 


 

Follow Spencer’s work at @jeepfreeks.

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