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The Keen Project

Leh Keen is sitting just above the floor in the front room of his warehouse space in Alpharetta, Georgia. There are stacks of tires, some racing memorabilia, and a few posters strewn about the space. All 6-foot-5 of his lanky length spills out of a racing bucket that’s been placed on the floor as impromptu seating.

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If you’ve been on the internet in the last few years, you’re aware of what Keen builds. He’s the originator of the Safari 911 trend, where Porsche 911s are built into off-road, rally-inspired machines. What started with Keen’s personal red 1981 Porsche 911 SC has turned into a steady business producing unique works of automotive art for driving enthusiasts.






To understand what makes Safari 911s so appealing, it helps to examine what it isn’t, and to start, it’s not like any other 911 you’ve ever seen. The classic teardrop shape of the G-series (1973-1989) has timeless, instantly recognizable proportions. And yet, when raised about four inches and BFGoodrich® All-Terrain T/A KO2 tires are installed at the corners, the slightly pretentious air that comes with buttoned-up German design perfection melts into a stifled chuckle.

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A Safari 911 — with its hood-mounted light pod and beefy tires — looks comical, the mad creation of a child drawing cars on scratch paper. And that’s kind of the point. The cartoonish proportions that come from too-big tires are kind of hilarious. And they communicate, better than anything else, why Safari 911s exist in the first place. “They’re just fun,” says Leh Keen.






Keen is not some butcher out to destroy Porsche’s design legacy. He is a Porschephile par excellence, a man who knows and loves Porsches better than most. After all, he got his start driving his father’s 911 at Porsche Club of America events, before racing for various teams in the Rolex Sports Car Series and the American Le Mans Series. There was a brief Japanese import phase, but barring a few outliers, all of Keen’s professional rides were Porsches, and it was in Porsches that he won the 2009 and 2011 Grand American Rolex GT Championships, and the 2012 American Le Mans Series GTC Championship.

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In truth, the genesis of the Safari 911 is in Keen’s own appreciation for the marque’s heritage. He was originally working on backdating a 964 into a more modern longhood — an homage to a 1973 RSR — and reproducing it for others, but quickly realized perfecting the process wasn't going to happen overnight.

At the same time, Keen was aware — as most car enthusiasts are — that the value of classic Porsches has skyrocketed over the past couple of decades. A rust-ravaged carcass at auction can likely fetch more than the cost of a brand new, reasonably equipped car — to say nothing of well-maintained examples. Which means that, despite the fact that Porsches are cars meant to be driven, they’ve become investments whose value is inversely related to the number of miles driven. Keen, at the end of the day, is a driver, and he wanted something he could drive without worrying about what he was doing to the investment value. In other words, Keen wanted a beater Porsche.

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Of course, he didn’t have to go down the route that would lead him to the Safari 911. However, Keen is a Georgia native, and his childhood was spent on dirt country roads riding ATVs — a fertile place as any for learning car control. With those roads as inspiration, Keen developed something that would be joyful to hoon on dirt roads, while still maintaining his connection to Stuttgart.

With the Safari 911, Keen has kept complication to a minimum. The base technology is as it was when the G-series 911s came out, albeit upgraded to suit Keen’s taste and the Safari’s off-road intentions. The suspension, for example, is simple strut and torsion bar affair — there aren’t any electronically adjustable dampers here. Engine upgrades, too, are kept simple: a better heat exchanger, exhaust, and filters, but nothing directed at wringing gobs more power out of the flat-six.

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In truth, power isn’t a requirement for enjoying the Safari. The 200 or so horsepower is enough for running about town, and who needs that much power when going sideways on a dirt road? The rear-engine, rear-wheel drive configuration of 911s make them intrinsically tail happy, and on gravel or dirt, it doesn’t take much throttle to kick the rear end out. Luckily, the up-armored, square-edged sidewalls of 215/65R16 KO2 tires provide the perfect tough biting edge for digging the car out of slides. As Keen amply — and eagerly — demonstrates, it's a remarkably low-drama affair to control a dirt road slide, even for a professional driver.




Though the Safari 911 is Keen’s brainchild, he’s not hand building each vehicle. Instead, he’s more of a general contractor who manages and organizes builds. Customers provide their own G-series donor car — preferably in decent shape — and work with Keen to spec out the car to their liking: color, interior fabric, spoiler, cage — the list of options is extensive. At that point, Keen begins sourcing parts and textiles. As the pieces arrive, he subcontracts to Atlanta-area specialists for the engine, body, upholstery, suspension, paint, and all the other work that goes into turnings parts and pieces into a whole Safari 911.

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While Keen may not be tightening every bolt, he’s still hands-on throughout the entire process. He’s constantly shuffling customer vehicles from shop to shop, running parts around town, and basically functioning as a one-man quality assurance department. But where Keen applies his personal touch is in the final setup of the car. He tests and shakes down each car, drawing on his years of motorsports experience and personal taste for how a Safari 911 should feel.

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It’s no doubt tedious work spending your days in Atlanta-area traffic, wrangling parts, shuffling build schedules, and going back and forth with clients. But the Safari 911 was born with fun in mind, and based on the big silly grin on Keen’s face as he slides Safari #1 through a gravel corner on a rural Georgia road, there’s still plenty of fun to be had.

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See more of Keen's Safari 911s and other Porsche related content on Instagram at @lehmank.

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Adventure Build

Art's 1994 Ford Bronco XLT

Editor's note: You've already seen Art Eugenio's work with GETSOMEphoto. As it turns out, it's hard to chase races without a capable rig of your own, and Art has that in the form of his Ford Bronco — all trimmed out in BFGoodrich® goodness.




I’d been searching for a vehicle to use to scout race courses that would be reliable, have parts easily accessible in Baja, could lock up all my gear inside, and could take me wherever I wanted to go on race course in the United States and Mexico.



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The Bronco platform seemed to be the best fit. It took some time to track down one that hadn’t been beat up over time, and it turned out a good friend of mine, Bob Bower, had the one I was looking for. It was completely cherry when I bought it: single owner and very well taken care of.

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With the livery, I wanted my Bronco to have style and history as well as some cool factor. I worked with some of the folks at BFGoodrich® Tires and we come up with a combination of the Rothmans Racing livery with some BFGoodrich flair. It came out really nice.

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I’ve had my Bronco for about 6 years now, and it’s gone through several changes over the years to make my job easier when I’m traveling deep into Baja covering races like the Baja 500 and Baja 1000, and other events like Vegas to Reno and the Parker 425.

  • Powerplant: 351w upgraded with heads, long headers, and a E303 cam. Pulls a little over 400hp. Flowmaster muffler, oversized UMP air filter to filter out all that dust. 
  • Drive train: E4OD automatic transmission built by John Wood and runs external coolers to keep the temperature down when running in the soft stuff out in the 120º heat. Transfer case is stock, for now. The rear end is a trussed big bearing Ford 9” Yukon nodular case with 31 spline Currie axles, 4:56 gears, and Detroit locker. The front is trussed D44 twin traction beams also with 4:56 gearing. Custom drivelines front and rear by Axis Metal Design.
  • Suspension: 2.5” King coilover 12” shocks with AGM sliders. Rear is 3” King smooth body and a custom leaf spring pack built by my friend Kris Hernandez. Other things like a swing-set steering from Threat Motorsports and interior cage Solo Motorsports to keep me safe. Lots of this was done with the help of my father Art Sr., my buddy Joe Desrosiers and many others. 
  • Interior: Mastercraft Baja RS seats, ARB fridge/freezer, Lowrance GPS, PCI race radio and intercom and a rack built to house a pit box, camera gear, and a spare BFGoodrich® All-Terrain T/A KO2 tire.
  • Exterior: Baja Designs LED lighting, Vision wheels, converted the stock spare tire carrier into a fuel and water rack and custom bumpers front and rear.


When it came to deciding on a tire for my Bronco, I was fortunate enough to be invited to the BFGoodrich® All-Terrain T/A KO2 launch held in Baja a few years back. I got to see the tire perform in the most extreme environment, and it was nothing short of amazing. The routes we did took us over some of the most extreme terrain you can think of, from desert sands, to rocks, mud, over mountains in the pouring rain, and down to the rocky coast lines of Baja.

This is pretty much what I get on any given event I cover. I was sold, and I got a set as soon as they were available. I am curious about the new Mud-Terrain T/A KM3 — I’d like to give those a try soon.

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At the end of the day, I love that I can really just go anywhere in my Bronco. I travel solo in most cases, and you really need something that not only gets you out there, but can get you home, too.



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Deep Orange 9

Right now, Clemson University might be known as a pipeline for NFL talent, but quietly, and just down I-85 from the North American headquarters for BFGoodrich® Tires, the university is proving to be just as reliable a pipeline for a different kind of talent.

The Clemson University International Center for Automotive Research (CU-ICAR) is about 40 minutes away from the main campus, but its proximity to Upstate South Carolina’s manufacturing and engineering base — think BMW and ZF Group, in addition to BFGoodrich® Tires and others — make it an ideal playground for aspiring automotive engineers.

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CU-ICAR is more than just a classroom or a lab, too. As an advanced research facility — and with over 20 industry partners — there’s a ton of equipment, technology, and expertise available for Clemson University graduate students. That’s where Deep Orange comes in. Designed as “an educational program for systems integration and accelerated vehicle prototyping,” there is real opportunity for engineers-in-training to fully develop vehicles from concept and design, to prototyping and production.

There’s already plenty of inherent complexity in designing something as multi-layered and integrated as a vehicle, but the Deep Orange program adds an additional wrinkle. With each incarnation of Deep Orange, students tackle environmental, social, and economic concerns. It’s not just about designing another mass-market crossover. It’s about pushing automotive and mobility innovation beyond the current landscape.

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For example, with Deep Orange 6, CU-ICAR students partnered with Toyota to produce UBox, a clean-sheet urban utility vehicle that takes into account the shift in lifestyles for Gen Z. Personalization, digital connectivity, and configurability were the watchwords of this design. Before that, students worked on Deep Orange 3 in 2012, a mainstream sports car that appealed to Gen Y’s environmental sensibilities and affinity for all-wheel drive. The powertrain concept reads like a spec sheet of a modern vehicle: a downsized four-cylinder internal combustion engine driving the front wheels, electric drive for the rear wheels, and a manual transmission to stay true to the car’s sporting pretensions.






While previous Deep Orange projects have been heavily influenced by consumer trends, Deep Orange 9 looked towards something significantly different: motorsports. Rallycross, in particular.

The team of 18 CU-ICAR students didn’t start out with a rallycross build in mind. Instead, their professors had two challenges they tasked the students to address: making small passenger cars more appealing; and improving fuel economy and reducing emissions. Of course, many of the students, car enthusiasts and motorsports fans themselves, wanted to build something cool and exciting.

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“We intended to do a racecar off the bat,” says Gregory Wheeler, Deep Orange 9’s team lead. “ICAR has always done something that’s a prototype for a manufacturer, so there traditionally wasn’t a lot of focus on the powertrain of the car.”

Between the interest in motorsports, the focus on making passenger cars more appealing, and the emissions/fuel economy goals, a rallycross car made the most sense for Deep Orange 9’s goals. Rallycross cars are typically based off production passenger cars like the Ford Fiesta and Honda Civic, and the sport is also one of the fastest growing segments in motorsports. It’s combination of exciting wheel-to-wheel, short-course, sprint-style racing on various driving surfaces — tarmac, mud, gravel, dirt — plus table-top jumps make it easy for spectating and broadcasting alike. As for the issue of emissions and fuel economy, ICAR students also looked towards motorsports that mandate the use of hybrid or electric power units.

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But while rallycross and motorsports served as conceptual inspiration, the team had to figure everything out on their own. “We really struggled with where to start, and how to start,” says Wheeler. “Race teams want to keep a lot of what their cars are capable of as secret as possible. We spent a lot of time watching rallycross races, doing some math, and doing simulations to figure out what kind of performance aspects we needed: how fast the acceleration was going to be, what kind of aerodynamic loads we needed to expect, and with rallycross specifically, what kind of loads the car suspension would experience making the 70-foot tabletop jump.”

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“We drew inspiration from all forms of motorsports and passenger cars,” adds Angel Rivera, the vehicle integration lead. “For example, Formula 1 had a more advanced hybrid thought process than rallycross did at the time. We also looked at what kind of battery to use, and as it turns out, buses have it pretty down pat. Looking at motorsports and passenger cars and talking to people on both sides definitely opened things up for us.”

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Ultimately, the team wanted not only a running racecar, but one that would be competitive on a rallycross course. As a result, they settled on a few important performance parameters for their Honda Civic-based build: 0-60 mph in 2 seconds, 600 horsepower, and 4-wheel steering, as well as a 30% reduction in emissions as compared to current racecars.






The Deep Orange 9 team spent the first semester of their two-year program in the classroom learning about the industry, how manufacturers operate, how to integrate systems, and how to manage a project as daunting as building a car. The design process didn’t start until the second semester. Wheeler organized the team into areas of responsibility — powertrain, vehicle dynamics, vehicle structure — while Rivera was responsible for making sure each system and subsystem would work together. “As engineers, we see our specialties — powertrain, vehicle dynamics, the body structure — but at the end of the day, it’s all one product: the vehicle,” explains Rivera. “As the systems integrator, it was my job to oversee the systems development for the car as a whole.”

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“Every part we put in the car, we designed in CAD first. We built the car [from those parts] in CAD, and made sure all the systems worked first,” says Wheeler. “There was a lot of trial and error. We’d come up with performance targets, and then we’d come up with ideas to get there. Sometimes they worked, sometimes they didn’t. For instance, once we figured out what kind of powertrain we wanted, we needed to figure out how to package it in the car.”

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On top of overseeing the performance targets, design process, and integration of all the parts, Wheeler also had to organize schedules and deadlines to make sure that systems were being completed and installed in a manner that made sense — installing the roll cage before installing the engine, for instance.

Throughout the process, the Deep Orange 9 team relied on their sponsors and partners for components, as well as valuable test data and feedback. With Honda, Aisin, JTEKT, and BFGoodrich® Tires headlining the group of partners, Wheeler and his team had plenty of technical expertise to draw upon. However, each partner made sure that the Deep Orange 9 team worked and learned — turnkey solutions weren’t part of the deal.

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Rivera recalls one particular instance of working with tire engineers from BFGoodrich® Tires. “Early on, we were asking how much camber does the [BFGoodrich® g-Force RC02] tire care for? Their answer was the tire doesn’t really care. It was a totally nonchalant response, but our vehicle dynamics guy really wanted the data. He really wanted to know for himself. So we got all this data from BFGoodrich, built a tire model, and sure enough, the tire doesn’t really give a damn. And when we went back to the tire engineers, they explained why the tire doesn’t care. They provided guidance without telling us. It was definitely a teaching moment. They were really good at giving us information, letting us learn on our own, while still nurturing us.”

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Essentially, the Deep Orange 9 had to figure out what information they needed, request it from their partners, and build out engineering models that would inform and justify their decisions. And sometimes, that wasn’t enough. Rivera recalls rounds and rounds of design reviews. “Basically you give a status update of the project. You stand up in front of sponsors and you tell them, ‘We made this decision for this reason.’ They look at it and ask why. And you give your answer, and they ask you why again. So it’s this several hour feedback loop of what are you doing, and why you’re doing it wrong.” Rivera laughs as he relates the experience. “When we got done, we always had two feelings. One was a sigh of relief of having made it through, and the other was a sigh of holy shit, we don’t know what we’re doing.”

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That feeling of being out of their depth never subsided, even as the project neared completion. Ultimately, the Deep Orange 9 team knew the quality of their work would be proven on the track. “That was just grueling for us because the car has to actually work,” says Rivera.




Wheeler, Rivera, and the rest of the Deep Orange 9 team graduated in May 2018, but over the weekend, they all came back to Clemson University to see the fruits of their labor. BFGoodrich® Tires ambassador, rally driver, and stuntman Andrew Comrie-Picard (@ACP), along with Pikes Peak International Hill Climb record setter and Honda R&D driver James Robinson, hosted the official unveiling of Deep Orange 9.

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The event stayed true to the vehicle’s rallycross and motorsports intentions, with an autocross course featuring Honda Civics and hot laps in Acura NSX cars (one production street car, and Robinson’s Time Attack 1 NSX).

And to cap off the unveiling, Wheeler, Rivera, and their team got to see the best reward of all: the Deep Orange 9 car running its own laps.

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Build

David’s 2017 Toyota Tundra SR5 CrewMax

Editor’s note: Reliability isn’t just an engine, a well-engineered bracket, or a bulletproof transmission. It’s a big-picture kind of thing. David Barlow wanted that kind of dependability, and that’s what he’s getting with his Toyota Tundra on BFGoodrich® Mud-Terrain T/A KM2s.

 


 

Since I was a child, I have always been fascinated with big, lifted trucks. Then, I got the off-roading bug at about 15 from a close friend of mine, Dillon Oliver, who went on a regular basis with his dad. Now, I take my Tundra off-road every chance I get. My favorite spots are Pismo Dunes, Shaver Lake 4x4 trails, and Hollister Hills SVRA 4x4 Park.

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I chose the Tundra because of Matt Gordon. Matt is the Owner of Orchard City RV, and his fleet is strictly Tundra SR5s used for towing large toy haulers and RV trailers. His Tundras are getting close to 300k miles, and he has had no mechanical issues.

That’s the part I love most about my truck: the reliability. The tires are part of it, too. I grew up in a BFGoodrich® Tires family. We have always believed in having the strongest, most durable, and rugged tire on the market that provides the best safety for transportation. When you have quality BFGs on your truck, you don’t have to worry about anything — on- or off-road; snow or mud. 

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I run 37x12.50r18 BFGoodrich® Mud-Terrain T/A KM2s, along with a host of other modifications: an 8” Pro-Comp lift; King Suspension coilovers; an N-Fab bumper; two Rigid light bars, one in the grill and one in bumper; 2 Rigid pods in the bumper; 18” Fuel Off-Road Vector wheels; Katzkin leather seats; air-ride rear bags, a Tonneau bed cover; AMP Research power steps; and much more! 

 


 

Check out David’s Tundra on Instagram at @sr5_gunner

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Build

Basil’s 2017 Ford Raptor

Editor’s note: Basil Khaja’s walk from the parking lot to his office is a long one. He’s an automotive engineer for a major auto manufacturer in Detroit, and his 2017 Ford Raptor is a competitor’s vehicle. But he loves his Raptor so much, you won’t see much griping from him: “I have no regrets.”

 


 

I grew up in Kuwait, and as a kid, my dad spent a lot of time at his mechanic's shop —probably since he drove unreliable cars. He would take me with him, and I loved watching the mechanics take things apart and put them back together. I always asked a million questions. Every once in a while, I would talk my dad into letting me take my 50cc ATV to the shop for a "tune-up" to make it faster — or so I thought! The mechanic would change the oil, top it off with gas, and tell me that it was running much better now.

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Eventually he taught me how to change my own oil, clean the carburetor, and check the spark plug. Since then, I have been hooked on all things automotive — I’ve just moved on to bigger and faster toys!

I have always been a fan of off-roading, whether it was riding quads out in the open desert; dirt-biking on steep, rocky trails; or mountain biking through the woods. It’s a great way to relieve built-up stress from work, as well as hone your technical skills and stay active. Going riding with friends and family has always been my favorite thing to do in my free time.

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In the senior year of my undergrad education, I took the lead on my university's SAE Baja car. I talked a couple of my classmates into helping me out, and together, we designed, built, and competed in a 10 horsepower off-road buggy. It was the most fun I had in my four years at that university, and I learned more in those six months than I had learned in class all year.

The first Ford Raptor had just been released, and I remember joking with my friends about how our Baja car would give it a run for its money. Fast forward to 2017. I sold my last truck — a simple entry-level F-150 — to a friend, and I soon realized that I needed another truck to replace it. My plan was to take a trip to my local dealership and buy another normal truck from the lot, but I had always been fascinated by the first-gen Ford Raptor and its legendary status among off-roaders everywhere.

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I had seen advertisements for the new and improved Gen 2 Raptor, but it wasn’t set to be released for a few months. I called up a few dealers in the area and found one that was willing to let me custom order one. It took four long months for the truck to finally show up, but it was well worth the wait!

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There are many things I love about my truck: the aggressive looks, the beefy suspension, and the powerful engine — even though the turbocharged V6 doesn’t sound that great. My modifications include a CORSA Performance exhaust system, ICON perch collars to lift the front end a bit, Method Race Wheels, some light pods and light bars, and a few other miscellaneous pieces of off-roading gear. In the future I would like to get some Deaver rear springs, a bump-stop kit, 37" BFGoodrich® All-Terrain T/A KO2 tires, and a heavy-duty front bumper.

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Right now, I run BFGoodrich® T/A KO2 tires (LT315/70SR17), with 17"x8.5" Method Race Wheels. They’re the best in the game right now. The KO2 tires I run have the greatest amount of tread surface area when aired down, and that translates to massive grip. When driving in the sand and over rocks, you need as much surface area on the ground as possible for adequate traction. These tires are also quiet on the road, and impressively compliant and “grippy” on multiple surfaces, from wet pavement to ice and snow. Even with the large amount of off-roading I do, I have seen good tread wear.

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I actually work as an automotive engineer at a major auto manufacturer in Detroit, and my Raptor is a vehicle that definitely stands out in an urban environment. I get a lot of waves and thumbs up, so it’s a pretty special experience. Parking in tight spots is not so fun, but I know that I can always climb up on a curb if I need to!

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One of my favorite local spots to hit is Silver Lake Sand Dunes here in Michigan. Flying through the sand and hitting jumps is always a good time! But the most memorable trip I have taken was a 10-day drive west for off-roading over the Easter holiday in 2018. My cousin and I drove the Raptor through a dozen states to meet up with Easter Jeep Safari in Moab, UT. We stopped at a bunch of amazing locations, like the Four Corners National Monument, Monument Valley, Canyonlands National Park, and many more. I “forgot” to inform my cousin (who is terribly afraid of heights) that we would be doing a lot of rock crawling and four-wheeling on the sides of steep canyons and cliffs, so as you can imagine he wasn’t very happy for a significant portion of the trip!

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See more of Basil’s Raptor on Instagram at @bad_rap_gen2.

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Build

Jorge’s 2016 Mercedes-Benz CLA 250

Editor’s note: We normally don’t get a ton of Mercedes-Benzes around here, but we also don’t usually see cars from Hawaii. Enjoy this island CLA from Jorge Hernandez.

 


 

I got my interest in cars from my dad because he’s always loved old muscle cars, but I chose my CLA because of the body style: it’s the perfect combination between a luxury and sporty car. I love every single centimeter on my car.

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I’ve added a carbon fiber rear spoiler and mirrors; the AMG Line and Night packages, and I’ve swapped the factory Pirelli run-flats for BFGoodrich g-Force COMP-2 A/S. I hated how noisy the Pirellis were, and BFGoodrich is my favorite brand of tires. (I have a Jeep Wrangler YJ with 32-inch All-Terrain T/A KO2s and they are the best 4x4 tire I’ve ever tried.)

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Recently, I moved to Kauai island, and my CLA on BFGs take me anywhere I want to go: Waimea Canyon, Hanalei Bay, Princeville, and Lanikai Beach on Oahu. I definitely enjoy driving more once I installed my BFGs.

 


 

Check out Jorge’s CLA on Hawaii on Instagram

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