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Jhay's 2009 Mitsubishi Lancer

Build

By Jhay Ar

 0  2

Editor’s note: Jhay Ar’s 2009 Mitsubishi Lancer is a labor of love. Be it the Las Vegas Strip or the desert roads of Arizona, the mods he’s made to the vehicle turn heads wherever he goes. Now, as a member of Team Hybrid, Jhay is ready to take his Lancer to even greater heights.

 


 

I came to the United States from the Philippines when I was eighteen years old. I started working at a gas station, and one day a group of guys came in with their modified cars. I was amazed and I went out and started talking to them. When they found out that I drove a 1992 Civic Hatchback, they asked me to join them. That’s when I really became interested in cars.

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My very first car show was Hot Import Nights in Long Beach, California. Team Hybrid was at that show, and I immediately became a big fan theirs. About four years ago, a couple of the team’s members saw my car on Instagram and Facebook and they invited me to join them.

I’ve always loved Mitsubishis. Mitsubishi has been with my family for a long time —my dad’s very first car in the Philippines was an ’82 Mitsubishi Lancer. In 2004, I purchased a 2004 Mitsubishi Ralliart OZ edition. And in 2008 when I graduated nursing school, I purchased a brand new Lancer as a gift to myself.

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I love the way my car looks and the way it drives. When I drive around with it, I get attention from everyone. Driving around Vegas and Arizona is something I really love because of the views and the great locations for photo shoots.  

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I don t really have an inspiration on building my car, I just want it to be unique and clean. My main goal is having my car featured in a major magazine and get recognized in big industry shows like SEMA. But the car has already gotten a lot of attention and I would like to show Hybrid Luv to the staff at BFGoodrich for allowing me to represent their company with their amazing products. The Comp 2 A/S tires have been really impressive.

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Here are the specs for my car: 

Exterior:

  • Solis hypercolor shift liquid wrap 
  • 2015 Lancer GT front bumper with JDP carbon fiber lip
  • 2009 Ralliart rear bumper with Evo 9 rear diffuser
  • APR GT carbon fiber side mirrors
  • Do Luck carbon fiber trunk (candy red)
  • VIS carbon fiber hood (candy red)
  • Varis side skirts
  • ARS HL2 rear lip
  • Wreckedlancer custom front fenders

Interior:

  • Bride ZETA III bucket seats
  • Buddy club seat rails
  • Bride fabric door panel
  • NRG quick release and short hub 
  • NARDI 350mm steering wheel
  • Red carbon fiber interior panels
  • Takata harness
  • NRG harness bar
  • ARC shift knob

Suspension:

  • D2 racing air suspension
  • Cusco rear anti sway bar
  • AEM front strut bar

 

Engine:

  • RRM SRI intake with HKS filter
  • TSW short throw shifter
  • ARC radiator cap
  • Mishimoto aluminum radiator
  • Red carbon fiber radiator cover

 

Audio:

  • Kenwood DNX 892
  • W3 12 inch Subwoofer x2
  • MB Quart 1500watts x2

Wheels and tires:

  • Volk TE37 SL wheels (18 x 11 +18, Top Secret Gold)
  • BFGoodrich g-Force Comp-2 A/S (235/40/18)
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Follow Jhay’s build on Instagram at @jhayar24_non_evo and the rest of the Team Hybrid family at @teamhybrid_95.

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Related Pit Crew Answers

How do I become a successful professional driver?

ACP

Q: How do I become a successful, professional driver?

A: That's a very difficult question to answer. A lot of top drivers in the world had a family connection or patron that got them into motorsports. Of the ones who built their careers totally on their own, there are a thousand different stories.

I know guys who started out as car jockeys at a local dealer until they could convince the dealer owner to sponsor them in a race; guys who scraped pennies together to go through a driver development program like Skip Barber; and even guys who got in through winning at car driving video games and getting the chance to try their skills in a real car.

Race driving is such an improbable career and so many people fail. The only way to possibly succeed is to absolutely love it, believe in yourself, and never give up. Never. Never.

All the successful one drivers share a few traits: they are 100% determined; they have passion and confidence; and they are quick to spot an opportunity and jump on it. If you don't, someone else will.

What are easy ways to become a better driver?

Terry Earwood

Q: What are easy ways to become a better driver?

A: Besides bolting on a set of BFGoodrich tires? 

Everyone you know wants to be the best driver you have ridden with, or at least that should be his goal. I know it’s been mine for over 50 years.

And we’ve all ridden with someone who makes us very nervous for many reasons.

You’ve heard the term "plan ahead" all your life, and that sums up this advice.

First, let’s look at what physically drives the car.

The hands do the steering (and maybe shifting!) and the feet accelerate or slow down your BFGoodrich tires. Where does their initial input come from? Yep, your vision. The hands and feet can (or should) only react to what the eyes are looking at. If the eyes aren’t looking far enough ahead, the hands and feet are reactive, not proactive, which results in jerky inputs to the wheel and sudden acceleration, or worser, sudden braking!

On the racetrack, we sorta "rifle-vision" our next reference, as car placement (the line) is critical for fast (safe) laps. We don’t have to worry about traffic lights, pedestrians, soccer balls, and cross traffic (for the most part). But we look far enough ahead (through the corner, not at the corner), to be sure we’re gonna stay on line, and to see when and how much power to add!

The street, however, presents thousands of issues we must deal with on a daily basis, so in order to be safe, we need to use our eyes much harder!

Number 1: In traffic, try to drive 3 seconds behind the car in front of you. This gives you plenty of reaction time should the car abruptly brake, or swerve, or spit out his rear differential suddenly. As the rear bumper of the car you’re following clears a stationery object—like a mailbox or maybe Jeff Cummings' Bronco—simply count "a thousand one-a thousand two-a thousand three" and you should arrive at the object. At 30 mph, it’s not very far, but the faster you go, the gap automatically becomes bigger!

Number 2: Back to the eyes. You should be able to see 12 seconds ahead of your car at all times. This is a key part of being smooth. A 12-second lead gives you plenty of time to change lanes, slow down smoothly, alert the folks behind you with turn signals, pull the chute, etc. This trick, too, is speed conducive.

Try to pick out the next large object in your natural vision, like a bridge. It should take you 12 seconds to arrive at the bridge.

At night, it's pretty easy. Look for the next object your headlights pick out, and slowly count to 12. If you get to the object under 12 seconds, you’re going faster than your ability to be smooth should something pop out.

Number 3: Scan your mirrors every 3 to 7 seconds. This is a key step in your new situational awareness. (I know—the dictionary defines "situational awareness" as “Looking for toilet paper before you sit down”.)  But if you’ve been in the mirrors within the last 7 seconds, and need to make a quick lane change, you have a pretty good idea if there is someone in that spot, or not. Is that Crown Vic getting closer? Is he changing lanes when I do?

Adjust your side view mirrors away from the car. In other words, move them just off of your rear fenders, which will give you the view of another half-a-lane of interstate you don’t have now.

What does it mean to be "smooth"?

Terry Earwood

Q: What does it mean to be "smooth"?

A: A huge part of "being smooth" is literally how your hands and feet adjust the controls. The first time I rode with my current ex-wife, after a few miles in her Durango, I asked how many throttle pedals or cables she had replaced in the last 6 months, for she was on and off the gas 17 times every 30 seconds! (I actually timed it!)

It was as if she was thinking, "Here’s some gas, let’s see how far this shot goes.” She'd coast a minute, pop the gas again, etc.

Good news/bad news. She thanked me profusely for pointing that out (I’m joking), but she did clean that up!

Instead, she swapped it for "steering response!" I would literally reach over and grab the wheel to show her we did not have to saw at the wheel every 3 feet.

It was a lot like popping the gas pedal: "Let’s steer right, oops too much, let’s go left!” So I advised we go back to popping the gas, since power steering pumps are more expensive than throttle cables. She actually was a pretty good driver, awesome with a manual tranny, but has now moved on to another driver coach. Or whatever. We’re still friends.

I'll also never forget a lesson my Dad taught me: "Pretend you have a nearly full glass of water on the dashboard. Be smooth enough to never slosh out any water.” My Dad had great cars, from Lincolns to Porsches to Jaguars, and he never ever put a scratch on one the 71 years he drove. And he drove quickly. We always compared “elapsed time, from say, Atlanta to Sebring. He was smooth, because he loved to drive, so he paid attention to details.

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