false

Art's 1994 Ford Bronco XLT

Adventure

Build

By getsomephoto

 0  3

Editor's note: You've already seen Art Eugenio's work with GETSOMEphoto. As it turns out, it's hard to chase races without a capable rig of your own, and Art has that in the form of his Ford Bronco — all trimmed out in BFGoodrich® goodness.




I’d been searching for a vehicle to use to scout race courses that would be reliable, have parts easily accessible in Baja, could lock up all my gear inside, and could take me wherever I wanted to go on race course in the United States and Mexico.



a description of the image

The Bronco platform seemed to be the best fit. It took some time to track down one that hadn’t been beat up over time, and it turned out a good friend of mine, Bob Bower, had the one I was looking for. It was completely cherry when I bought it: single owner and very well taken care of.

a description of the image

With the livery, I wanted my Bronco to have style and history as well as some cool factor. I worked with some of the folks at BFGoodrich® Tires and we come up with a combination of the Rothmans Racing livery with some BFGoodrich flair. It came out really nice.

a description of the image
a description of the image

I’ve had my Bronco for about 6 years now, and it’s gone through several changes over the years to make my job easier when I’m traveling deep into Baja covering races like the Baja 500 and Baja 1000, and other events like Vegas to Reno and the Parker 425.

  • Powerplant: 351w upgraded with heads, long headers, and a E303 cam. Pulls a little over 400hp. Flowmaster muffler, oversized UMP air filter to filter out all that dust. 
  • Drive train: E4OD automatic transmission built by John Wood and runs external coolers to keep the temperature down when running in the soft stuff out in the 120º heat. Transfer case is stock, for now. The rear end is a trussed big bearing Ford 9” Yukon nodular case with 31 spline Currie axles, 4:56 gears, and Detroit locker. The front is trussed D44 twin traction beams also with 4:56 gearing. Custom drivelines front and rear by Axis Metal Design.
  • Suspension: 2.5” King coilover 12” shocks with AGM sliders. Rear is 3” King smooth body and a custom leaf spring pack built by my friend Kris Hernandez. Other things like a swing-set steering from Threat Motorsports and interior cage Solo Motorsports to keep me safe. Lots of this was done with the help of my father Art Sr., my buddy Joe Desrosiers and many others. 
  • Interior: Mastercraft Baja RS seats, ARB fridge/freezer, Lowrance GPS, PCI race radio and intercom and a rack built to house a pit box, camera gear, and a spare BFGoodrich® All-Terrain T/A KO2 tire.
  • Exterior: Baja Designs LED lighting, Vision wheels, converted the stock spare tire carrier into a fuel and water rack and custom bumpers front and rear.


When it came to deciding on a tire for my Bronco, I was fortunate enough to be invited to the BFGoodrich® All-Terrain T/A KO2 launch held in Baja a few years back. I got to see the tire perform in the most extreme environment, and it was nothing short of amazing. The routes we did took us over some of the most extreme terrain you can think of, from desert sands, to rocks, mud, over mountains in the pouring rain, and down to the rocky coast lines of Baja.

This is pretty much what I get on any given event I cover. I was sold, and I got a set as soon as they were available. I am curious about the new Mud-Terrain T/A KM3 — I’d like to give those a try soon.

a description of the image

At the end of the day, I love that I can really just go anywhere in my Bronco. I travel solo in most cases, and you really need something that not only gets you out there, but can get you home, too.



a description of the image

Most Recent   /   Most Liked

Related Pit Crew Answers

How do I become a successful professional driver?

ACP

Q: How do I become a successful, professional driver?

A: That's a very difficult question to answer. A lot of top drivers in the world had a family connection or patron that got them into motorsports. Of the ones who built their careers totally on their own, there are a thousand different stories.

I know guys who started out as car jockeys at a local dealer until they could convince the dealer owner to sponsor them in a race; guys who scraped pennies together to go through a driver development program like Skip Barber; and even guys who got in through winning at car driving video games and getting the chance to try their skills in a real car.

Race driving is such an improbable career and so many people fail. The only way to possibly succeed is to absolutely love it, believe in yourself, and never give up. Never. Never.

All the successful one drivers share a few traits: they are 100% determined; they have passion and confidence; and they are quick to spot an opportunity and jump on it. If you don't, someone else will.

What does it mean to be "smooth"?

Terry Earwood

Q: What does it mean to be "smooth"?

A: A huge part of "being smooth" is literally how your hands and feet adjust the controls. The first time I rode with my current ex-wife, after a few miles in her Durango, I asked how many throttle pedals or cables she had replaced in the last 6 months, for she was on and off the gas 17 times every 30 seconds! (I actually timed it!)

It was as if she was thinking, "Here’s some gas, let’s see how far this shot goes.” She'd coast a minute, pop the gas again, etc.

Good news/bad news. She thanked me profusely for pointing that out (I’m joking), but she did clean that up!

Instead, she swapped it for "steering response!" I would literally reach over and grab the wheel to show her we did not have to saw at the wheel every 3 feet.

It was a lot like popping the gas pedal: "Let’s steer right, oops too much, let’s go left!” So I advised we go back to popping the gas, since power steering pumps are more expensive than throttle cables. She actually was a pretty good driver, awesome with a manual tranny, but has now moved on to another driver coach. Or whatever. We’re still friends.

I'll also never forget a lesson my Dad taught me: "Pretend you have a nearly full glass of water on the dashboard. Be smooth enough to never slosh out any water.” My Dad had great cars, from Lincolns to Porsches to Jaguars, and he never ever put a scratch on one the 71 years he drove. And he drove quickly. We always compared “elapsed time, from say, Atlanta to Sebring. He was smooth, because he loved to drive, so he paid attention to details.

What's your favorite stunt driving story?

ACP

Q: What’s your favorite stunt driving story?

A: I went to Eastern Europe this year to do stunts on a spy film. When I got there, I learned that, instead of doubling an actor, I would be driving a specially-built car from the back seat while the star sat in the front seat and pretended to drive.

The stunt was a high-speed, reverse-180 down a narrow European street. So there I am, crunched down in the rear seat with a second steering wheel, pedals, and gearshift, wearing a ninja outfit so the cameras don't see me. Meanwhile, one of the sexiest female stars in the world was leaning back against my knees as I'm whipping the car backwards at 50mph. It's at times like that you absolutely have to be confident that you're going to nail the stunt!

Search

Looking for something?
Try the search bar below.

Please enter valid search term.

Forgot Password

Don't have an account yet? Sign up here.

Forgot Your
Password

Please enter the email address associated with your account and we will help you recover your password.

Forgot Password

Don't have an account yet? Sign up here.

Forgot Your
Password

Please enter the email address associated with your account and we will help you recover your password.

Forgot Password

Don't have an account yet? Sign up here.

Forgot Your
Password

Please enter the email address associated with your account and we will help you recover your password.

Forgot Password

Don't have an account yet? Sign up here.

Forgot Your
Password

Please enter the email address associated with your account and we will help you recover your password.

Forgot Password

Don't have an account yet? Sign up here.

Forgot Your
Password

Please enter the email address associated with your account and we will help you recover your password.

Forgot Password

Don't have an account yet? Sign up here.

Forgot Your
Password

Please enter the email address associated with your account and we will help you recover your password.

Forgot Password

Don't have an account yet? Sign up here.

Forgot Your
Password

Please enter the email address associated with your account and we will help you recover your password.

Forgot Password

Don't have an account yet? Sign up here.

Forgot Your
Password

Please enter the email address associated with your account and we will help you recover your password.

Forgot Password

Don't have an account yet? Sign up here.

Forgot Your
Password

Please enter the email address associated with your account and we will help you recover your password.

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Already have an account? Sign in here.